#1
i was wondering that i dont know much about power chords.
(they are diads with the root and his fifth i know it well)
but when making a song how can someone lead in a power chords rythm or viceversa?
you have to use the 5th interval of the root note of the power chords or im wrong, can someone explain me this? thx

IN FACT: how can you lead(solo) over powerchords (explain with theory plz)..
Last edited by axl611 at Aug 25, 2008,
#2
i didnt understand what you were asking..
can you explain yourself more?
#4
well in fact, yes, how can you lead(solo) over powerchords (explain with theory plz)..
#5
i dont think its too much of an issue, as long as you're in the same key.
#6
ok lets say you got this (common) progression:
D5,G5,A5
now its in the key of d (I-IV-V),you could solo over any d scale basically,cause power chords only contain the root and fifth,which except name and stability,have nothing.
therefore you are not limited to major/minor etc`..
another way is to solo over each chord as its own
#7
its just like playing over a bassline...
the theory is simple...
the first and the fifth notes are played and you solo in it...
#8
Quote by axl611
i was wondering that i dont know much about power chords.
(they are diads with the root and his fifth i know it well)
but when making a song how can someone lead in a power chords rythm or viceversa?
you have to use the 5th interval of the root note of the power chords or im wrong, can someone explain me this? thx

IN FACT: how can you lead(solo) over powerchords (explain with theory plz)..
Find the key. Improvise with that major pentatonic scale (so if its in the key of A, use A pentatonics). Simple as that.

I know alot of guys would disagree with me on this, but dont view powerchords as chords. They're not. They dont resolve like chords and they sound more like a beefed out melodic line than a chord progression.

If you wanted to get really funky with your leads, try to apply some simple contrapuctual rules. Only use harmonic major/minor sixths and major/minor thirds and perfect fifths and perfect fourths in relation to the powerchord over the strong beats (The first beat and third beat in 4/4 music). Over the weak beats you could use any diatonic note and even some out of key notes.
#9
What I do with that, in terms of theory, is that I try to find out all the notes of the entire power chord progression (e.g. C5, D5, E5, F5, G5, A5, B5,) - all those seven notes as well as their respective perfect fifths will fit the progression.
#10
As demon suggested, you have plenty of options. Just find the key first, and then realize that you have nearly limitless options. Because power chords don't establish a tonality on their own, you have lots of freedom to play over them. You set the mood with your melodies as opposed to the chording.
#11
I agree with demon in that power "chords" are not chords. One interesting trick I use in fitting with this mentality is to turn them INTO chords with your lead. Add the third to the root of the power chord, or the second and the third for an add9 chord. Use your imagination, you'll come up with some cool phrases.
#12
The majority of my songs I use powerchords, and when I solo over them, I usually for the first time a chord is strummed, I play the root, and then I usually throw in the 5th or 3rd or both, and then I'll throw in whatever I think sounds best , and I will repeat that "formula" over the other chords. (i usually play 16 notes per bar)

Example :

if my progression is C5, E5, G5, C5

i'd play something like this

c5 e5

e-8---------7-----------
B-----5h8------5--8-----3
G-----------------------5-- etc...
#13
That makes sense to me. Personally, I think so long as you're in the key of one of the powerchords in the progression (assuming that the powerchords are in a key'd progression), you can't go far wrong. Use some creativity.
#14
they're not chords.... however... you usually do perceive them to function as chords because a few of them strung together usually establishes the harmonic environment...

remember the stuff about horizontal and vertical harmony..? a chord sequence using powerchord gives up its tonal information horizontally...

e.g. if I play some cheesy Blink-182 style thing:

E5 -> B5 -> C#5 -> A5

none of the chords give up their character on their own but you perceive the E to be major after 1 time around because of the stuff that surrounds it... so, they're not chords... but if they function as chords... they are chords
out of here
#15
Quote by inflatablefilth
none of the chords give up their character on their own but you perceive the E to be major after 1 time around because of the stuff that surrounds it... so, they're not chords... but if they function as chords... they are chords

Regardless of their function, by definition they are not chords. They're harmonic intervals which obviously serve a harmonic purpose, but a chord is three or more notes.
#16
Quote by :-D
Regardless of their function, by definition they are not chords. They're harmonic intervals which obviously serve a harmonic purpose, but a chord is three or more notes.


ok... thanks for clearing that up
out of here