#1
I just realized that every song I've performed with my band had a bassline I almost completely made up to fit the song, mostly out of laziness to work out the correct bassline (and because most tabs for popular songs are no where near correct).

Do you do this when you have to learn a set list fast, or do you strictly stick to the correct bassline?

P.S. No, I didn't just play root notes before you ask.
#3
I do it a lot, even on songs that I know how to play.
I think it's funner because a lot of stuff has the bass either mixed out or is just too quiet.
#4
Quote by Bottle of Dirt
I do it a lot, even on songs that I know how to play.
I think it's funner because a lot of stuff has the bass either mixed out or is just too quiet.


Yeah, that's what I meant by "laziness to work out the correct bassline". Researching what they actually play could sometimes take forever.
#5
ill usually look up tabs, but i dont know why i do cause i very rarely stick to em. unless they sound perfect to me but that almost never happens
#6
if its a song thats **** hard like yyz i stick to the original because i dont want to get off time or mess up trying to do my own thing, but if its something thats basic to high intermidiate i like to add in my own like personal extension on to it, as long as it doesnt mess up the overall sound of the band
#7
Unless the cover has a super unique bass line (Iron Man) etc. Make it up. Because it usually is not heard or noticed by anyone in the actual song.
#8
I tend to stick to the original bassline, but that's because the covers my band does tend to have a) a dominant bassline and b) have reasonably accurate tabs and guitar pro files on here.

On occasion I'll make one more complex or simplify it, but I do tend to stick as closely as possible to the original. I write my own material if I want an original bassline - I'm not going to try and 'fix' McCartney's bass playing on Something or Entwistle's on Pinball Wizard.
#9
Mix both? I usually read through and learn the tab/music, listen to the original recording, pick out the key riffs and fills that just need to be in there, and the rest I consider myself to have free reign on.

When I'm playing with my own band anyhow. If I'm with an actual covers band, I learn it note for note because, well, that's what people come to hear.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#10
My band tries to stay true to the originals so I almost always learn the actual bassline.
#12
I improvise. everything. it's kinda sad really.
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#14
I've always wanted to slap Master Of Puppets (like Les Claypool) if I ever play it with my band.
#15
I usually try and pick out the main parts in riffs and improvise around the,. This is the exact same thing when writing/performing with my band. I'll over time come up with a riff that I like(it's usually more than a phrase or motif than riff) then improvise around it. I find playing a lot more fun this way.
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#16
I try to stick thematically to the original bass line but then put my own twist on it, so it isn't a straight cover, but rather an interpretation.

Beyond the group situation, I do learn bass lines verbatim, but more to learn a specific technique or style or as a personal challenge.
#17
One of my pet peeves for cover songs, sorry if I offend, is bass players who play the "tab" bass line note for note, accent for accent, fill for fill, regardless of what the rest of the band is doing. If everyone - especially the drummer - is playing the song verbatim, it's fine. However, if the drummer is throwing in something different, you have to maintain the link with the drummer and the rest of the band.
#18
Quote by scawti
One of my pet peeves for cover songs, sorry if I offend, is bass players who play the "tab" bass line note for note, accent for accent, fill for fill, regardless of what the rest of the band is doing. If everyone - especially the drummer - is playing the song verbatim, it's fine. However, if the drummer is throwing in something different, you have to maintain the link with the drummer and the rest of the band.


I've seen some amateurs who stick so closely to tabs that they won't even change key with the rest of the band to suit the singer. Playing transposed down 1 note to the rest of the band never turns out well. (red flag that your bassist is tone deaf)
#19
Quote by the humanity
I improvise. everything. it's kinda sad really.

Ditto, minus the sad.
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#20
I always play a simplified version of the original, even if the original is extremely simple already.
Now THAT is sad.
#21
Well, I've found that metal doesn't usually allow much room for improvising.
#22
Quote by ele1122
Well, I've found that metal doesn't usually allow much room for improvising.

that's why blues rock is so much better. not as supportive as blues but not as spastic as metal.

yes there are exceptions.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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