#1
Well my friend passed me his sh*ty accoustic guitar and I'd want to change the strings on it but can't figure out how to do it as they are weirdly attached to the bridge. I don't want to break it either, maybe they are unchangeable I don't know. I'm providing a pic there. Any ideas?

#4
Lol.

Your guitar is not an acoustic guitar in the sense of it being a steel stringed acoustic guitar(which is what you normally think of when you say "acoustic). The guitar is a classical guitar and sounds very different from a steel stringed guitar. It uses nylon strings. Get it into a shop and have them show you how to restring it. You have to tie a knot in order to get the nylon strings on.
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#5
Put new nylon string on one at a time the same way as same they come off. As any Classical guitarist would tell you, the photo of the ties at the bridge is basically correct as classical strings [mostly] do not come will ball ends and neither do they need them. For a slightly neater tie improvement for the base strings, go here and check out re-stringing a classical guitar :

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 26, 2008,
#6
put the strings with the rings (ball?) at the end
Quote by RetroGunslinger
this is like comparing a flushing toilet to a hole in the ground
#7
After owning and playing [quite a few] classicals over many years, I've never seen a classical strung with brass ball-end nylon strings. I don't think it would be a good move. Classical guitar bridges are not designed for metal ball-end strings. Go to any guitar store and look at their classical guitars. You won't find any strung will ball-end nylon strings. After a Goggle, apparently Dean Markley make them but I'd be wary of using them. Steel string guitar strings [ball-end] go down into the body where there is a thick piece of wood backing on the underside of the sound-board for them to pull up against. Putting them up against the the horizontal grain of a classical bridge could very well split the bridge unless the bridge is especially designed for them [custom made]. A standard classical bridge might last for awhile with ball-ends, but then suddenly split.

Standard Classical strings are simple to tie if you follow the correct procedure on the Fretts site [or the way they are done in your photo]. I'd stick with strings that 99.99% of classical players use and that ain't ball-end strings!
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 26, 2008,
#8
LOL
"weird strings"
geez man give that classical guitar a break. thats how theyre supposed to be.
#9
It's probably worth mentioning that you can't put steel strings on a classical guitar.
#10
Quote by Jarryd.
It's probably worth mentioning that you can't put steel strings on a classical guitar.


Spot on man. Steel strings on a classical is a good way to turn the guitar into kindling for the fire. 185 lbs. of steel string tension that a classical guitar was never designed or built for!
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 26, 2008,
#11
Thank you, I would've never thought this was actualy a classical guitar, what is the difference with an accoustic one?
#12
Quote by Akabilk
After owning and playing [quite a few] classicals over many years, I've never seen a classical strung with brass ball-end nylon strings. I don't think it would be a good move. Classical guitar bridges are not designed for metal ball-end strings. Go to any guitar store and look at their classical guitars. You won't find any strung will ball-end nylon strings. After a Goggle, apparently Dean Markley make them but I'd be wary of using them. Steel string guitar strings [ball-end] go down into the body where there is a thick piece of wood backing on the underside of the sound-board for them to pull up against. Putting them up against the the horizontal grain of a classical bridge could very well split the bridge unless the bridge is especially designed for them [custom made]. A standard classical bridge might last for awhile with ball-ends, but then suddenly split.

Standard Classical strings are simple to tie if you follow the correct procedure on the Fretts site [or the way they are done in your photo]. I'd stick with strings that 99.99% of classical players use and that ain't ball-end strings!


Here you have them
http://www.daddario.com/DADProducts.aspx?ID=4&CLASS=ADUA
Classical nylons especially for musicians having no background whatsoever in either scouting or yachting.

The reason why steel strings are unsuitable for this type of guitar has nothing to do with ball ends or not. String tension is the only reason for that. There is no real technical necessity for not having ball ends on a nylon. As far as I can see it's just another stupid tradition, like the wooden tuning pegs on a violin or a three piece bridge on a Tele.
Last edited by Marcel Veltman at Aug 26, 2008,
#13
Stupid tradition to you and your entitled to your opinion, but I'm afraid almost all the world's violin and classical guitar players disagree with you and their entitled to their opinion too I guess [?]
#14
Quote by Akabilk
Stupid tradition to you and your entitled to your opinion, but I'm afraid almost all the world's violin and classical guitar players disagree with you and their entitled to their opinion too I guess [?]


Sure they are. And they really should stick to it. To call such opinions Stupid is a bit harsh on my side. I apologize for that.
However; paying tribute to tradition is one thing, but claiming that there are technical reasons to stick to certain obsolete and, from an engineering point of view, inadequate solutions is quite another. If someone would say, for example, that ball ended nylon strings ruin the delicate tone of an acoustic, this would be more than an opinion. It would be a claim that can be proven right or wrong in a simple double blind test. If after failing such test this person would still stick to his opinion, well... that I would call stupid.
#15
Are you retarded? Thats a classical guitar you imbecile, and those strings probably don't need changing, they're not even made for a pick, they're made for picking in a classical style...


like this....

http://www.youtube.com/v/8NDIWItUhNI
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78' twin reverb (loud awesome tone)

practice makes practice... never perfect
#16
Quote by Marcel Veltman
Sure they are. And they really should stick to it. To call such opinions Stupid is a bit harsh on my side. I apologize for that.
However; paying tribute to tradition is one thing, but claiming that there are technical reasons to stick to certain obsolete and, from an engineering point of view, inadequate solutions is quite another. If someone would say, for example, that ball ended nylon strings ruin the delicate tone of an acoustic, this would be more than an opinion. It would be a claim that can be proven right or wrong in a simple double blind test. If after failing such test this person would still stick to his opinion, well... that I would call stupid.


To call the standard stringing of classical guitars 'obsolete' when 99.99% of classical players do exactly that, shows you are obviously not a classical guitar player, so I'll put your opinion in the bottom draw and leave it there. When John Williams changes over to ball-end strings, so will I.
#17
Akabilk and Marcel, this discussion has gone far enough and is not helping the threadstarter answer his/her original question, nor the second question posted by him/her, which everyone seems to be ignoring. If you'd like to continue, I suggest you do it via pm's.

Koncept17, the primary difference between a steel string acoustic guitar and a nylon string classical guitar is playing style. A steel string can be played with either a flat pick or by fingerpicking. A classical guitar is primarily played by fingerpicking. A classical has a wider neck to allow for some of the more complex chords and fretwork needed for classical songs, and to allow room to maneuver to those chords because of the thicker strings.
A steel string guitar will have whats called a "truss rod" installed inside of the neck of the guitar that helps to counteract the pull of the strings, which is considerably stronger than that of nylon strings. Simple neck design is sufficient to keep the neck straight on a classical with nylons, but attempt to put steels on it and bad things can happen fast. Your bridge for example, with the string ends tied off, is one area not suited to steel strings. It can't take the torture applied to it by the pull of steel strings and would more than likely tear itself in half. A steel string acoustic has a different styled bridge and is braced and beefed up accordingly to take the punishment.
By the way, the pull of steel strings can be upwards of 180lbs., or the weight of a fully grown man.
#18
Quote by koncept17
Thank you, I would've never thought this was actualy a classical guitar, what is the difference with an accoustic one?


classical guitar -> nylon strings
acoustic guitar -> steel strings