#1
It's a question i'm highly frustrated about at the moment. Let's put it this way, if I don't write songs for my band actively they might think i'm undedicated and lazy, and I will be yet another ( at least around here) lazy bassplayer who just goes along.
Truth is, I want to be so more than that, which is why I every time I play with people try to strengthen my bassplaying in all aspects. This is however not noticed by most people and no matter how much I try to make the band better by adding a certain playingstyle I go unnoticed.

So my question to you all is if you help writing tunes for your band to stay upfront, or if you let people write tunes and you just focus on building up a good rythm section with the drummer and become a vital component of your sound? Or do you do both, and if so how do you combine them best?
#2
I just improvise. if I really want attention at the moment, I'll just stage dance.

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#3
if you want to be noticed stop playing mid song
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#4
Quote by skater dan0
if you want to be noticed stop playing mid song

lmfao he has a point.
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#5
It really depends on the people you're playing with. If you're in a band with people who believe bass is relatively unimportant, it will show through. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with contributing material, although that does give you free reign with the basswork.
I have no creative input in the band that I'm in. The guitarist writes the bass parts and the guitar parts and just lets the drummer improvise, but he really values the bass in music, so the bass parts he writes generally result in someone saying "Dude, your bassist is badass."

tl;dr - If your band digs the bass, so will everyone watching.
#6
My brother is the bassist in my band.

He sings, helps write lyrics, and he also writes bass parts that help determine the structure of the song. He basically ties everything together, because I write my own riffs and the other guitarist writes his own riffs, so the only person who really helps write both sets of songs is my brother.
#7
If you wanna stand out you have to do some stuff solo...
It doesn't have to be good, it just has to be obvious. Else you won't stand out.
Just ask your band for like a couple of moments in a song where you can do that.

Good examples: RHCP: Flea has his own solo work as well as many jams with just him and John where he obviously plays a part.
Stray Cats: During a live version of their 'stray cat strut', their bassplayer would do a kickass bass solo in the middle of the song, often accompanied by the singer shouting "put your hands together for him. the greatest mother****ing bassplayer in the world"
#8
I am pretty much the designated lyric writer in my band and I come up with alot of bass riffs aswell, in my band 3 of us were friends for years before we became band mates so theres a healthy level of respect for all instruments in the song.
#9
Quote by madbasslover
It really depends on the people you're playing with. If you're in a band with people who believe bass is relatively unimportant, it will show through. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with contributing material, although that does give you free reign with the basswork.
I have no creative input in the band that I'm in. The guitarist writes the bass parts and the guitar parts and just lets the drummer improvise, but he really values the bass in music, so the bass parts he writes generally result in someone saying "Dude, your bassist is badass."

tl;dr - If your band digs the bass, so will everyone watching.


Completely agree ...I'm not a bass player, but I've been in similar situations and what has occurred to me is that its really NOT your fault that you are not appreciated as long as you are giving it all you have. People have different opinions about songwriting and song structure...and I guess its a matter of finding the right people who share similar views

As far as what is more important ...I would say go with what you want to do ...if you feel you want to write songs and improve your song writing skills ...by all means do that ....if you feel you need to improve your playing skills ...go with that . IMO its NEVER a good idea to do something because its what someone else expects out of you and not what you want ....
#10
You really shouldn't be thinking "how can I stand out more?" You should be thinking "what's best for the band?" If you've already got a guitarist wanking his instrument off every minute, there's not going to be much space in order to stand out anyway.

I never, EVER write songs for my band thinking "how can I make bass the prominent part?" If bass becomes the melody maker, then so be it, it's purely accidental. I'm quite happy sitting back and building up the rhythm, and I'm equally at home being right at the top of things. I sincerely believe that that has come from playing both bass and guitar, and that is my advice to you- the more you understand about other instruments in, the easier it gets to write stuff, as you can have them in mind a bit more, and the less you'll care about "standing out." Instead, you'll care more about making things work.
#11
I agree with Ben here; you need to write and play what is best for the song.

And sometimes the most simple straightforward bass lines are the most memorable parts of the song. Look at a song like "Green Onions" by Booker T and the MGs--what do most people remember from that song? Duck Dunn's distinctive bass line.