#1
Hey, I was hoping someone could help me on all aspects of the theory behind triplets. Sorry about the lack of specific questions, just any help would be appreciated.
#3
I find that eighth note triplets are more common...That's three notes being played in one beat. If you're having trouble figuring out how that's supposed to sound, start tapping your desk to a steady beat...and say "trip-uh-let" every time you hit the desk, but spread out each syllable evenly. That was how I really learned how to count off triplets.
#4
Quote by The_Sophist
Hey, I was hoping someone could help me on all aspects of the theory behind triplets. Sorry about the lack of specific questions, just any help would be appreciated.


as nate763 said, it's three notes (equally spaced in length) in the time of two

it's what they call a 'tuplet': http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuplet

you can have any number of notes in the the time of any other number of notes... i.e 5:4, 7:6, 11:8. 5:3 etc, but a triplet, (3:2) is the very simplest tuplet you can get

this rather silly but rather accurate transcription that I did of a Frank Zappa bass line shows how far out tuplets can get, especially when you 'nest' them:


out of here
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Aug 26, 2008,
#5
Quote by inflatablefilth
as nate763 said, it's three notes (equally spaced in length) in the time of two

it's what they call a 'tuplet': http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuplet

you can have any number of notes in the the time of any other number of notes... i.e 5:4, 7:6, 11:8. 5:3 etc, but a triplet, (3:2) is the very simplest tuplet you can get

this rather silly but rather accurate transcription that I did of a Frank Zappa bass line shows how far out tuplets can get, especially when you 'nest' them:




#6
Is a triplet not three notes in the space of one note, and not two?

I'm sure that's what i was taught...
We're just dancing
We're just hugging,singing, screaming, kissing, tugging
On the sleeve of how it used to be
#7
Quote by RockinRoses
Is a triplet not three notes in the space of one note, and not two?

I'm sure that's what i was taught...

It is three even subdivisions of a beat/note. If you have a quarter note, then its subdivision is an 8th note, and 3 even 8th notes gives a triplet, which spans one 4th notes (which when subdivided correctly, gives 2 8ths notes, which is what you were saying kind of)...

Don't confuse it with duplets, or cuadruplets, etc...
#8
Quote by RockinRoses
Is a triplet not three notes in the space of one note, and not two?

I'm sure that's what i was taught...


no

if you have a beam with just a number (i.e. 3 or 5), it's always that number in the time of the next lowest power of two... so 3 is shorthand for 3:2, 5 is short for 5:4, 7 is short for 7:4 etc
out of here
#9
Quote by gonzaw
It is three even subdivisions of a beat/note. If you have a quarter note, then its subdivision is an 8th note, and 3 even 8th notes gives a triplet, which spans one 4th notes (which when subdivided correctly, gives 2 8ths notes, which is what you were saying kind of)...

Don't confuse it with duplets, or cuadruplets, etc...


Ah, I get it now. Thank you

I think i just have a really simplified way of thinking about them. Like strawberry strawberry (123 123).
That's where i've got it from.
We're just dancing
We're just hugging,singing, screaming, kissing, tugging
On the sleeve of how it used to be