#1
I can alt pick power chords on the lowest 3 strings, but anything higher than that gives me trouble. The problem is, the highest string in the power chord stands out more than the rest. Like say a power chord that uses the 5th,4th, and 3rd string, the 3rd one stick out more and the chord sounds higher pitched. Its almost like im not hitting all the strings in the chord at once. I feel that if its a chord on the lowest 3 strings, i can alt pick it more freely, while chords that use higher strings i have to concentrate more on hitting only those strings and not anything else. Any help?
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#4
You would think this would be very simple but it's not! I struggled with this till I realized I needed to s-l-o-w way down and concentrate on my accuracy with my pick and what strings I was hitting.

I also found this problem again when I started learning double-stops. Again, being accurate with the pick was my key to clean success. To practice this one, I played scales using all double-stops. This will let you know real quick if you are not being accurate

Chris
Last edited by RCShadow at Aug 27, 2008,
#5
+1 to RCShadow. Slow things down and focus on being accurate and consistent. Also, try to move your hand as a whole over the strings as compared to moving all from the wrist and stretching over to the higher strings if you're doing that.

*edit*
It would help to turn your mids down. Maybe even turn the treble down too.


No. Messing with the EQ to cover up bad technique isn't the way to go; it's bound to limit what you can do sooner or later, tonally if not technically.
Last edited by MopMaster at Aug 27, 2008,
#6
=MopMasterNo. Messing with the EQ to cover up bad technique isn't the way to go; it's bound to limit what you can do sooner or later, tonally if not technically.


I totally agree with you 100%. "Scooping" your mids has it's place, but I practice on my clean channel, get it down, then add my OD/Distortion when I get up to 80% of the actual time. If it sounds bad, I just go back to clean (again, slow down) and master the riff that way then try again.

Chris
#7
What are double stops? If i practiced scales with them would that help me with what im having trouble with?
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#8
Double stops are two notes played at the same time.... Interval is another term, however, double stops usually are like a Barre on the 12th fret on like the 2nd and 3rd strings. There annoying to do (IMO... Then again, I cant do em all to well), however, if you do get it down.... It's an amazing little technique.
Life is like an Empty Box, there could be something exciting in it at first look, but upon further review, well, it's empty.

#9
Oh, i know what your talking about. I can't do that stuff for ****.
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#10
That's not a good thought process to be getting into a habit of; avoiding stuff just because it's difficult is asking to not make progress.

Also, "doublestop" is just a term for 2 notes played together. A power"chord" is actually just a doublestop. And also, playing the same fret on 2 adjacent strings (apart from G & B) is the same as playing a powerchord, apart from that the root is above the 5th pitch-wise as compared to the root below the 5th in the "usual" method of playing powerchords, hitting a fret and 2 frets above that on the next string up (pitch-wise).

/rant?
#11
I never said i was avoiding anything. Why do you think im here?
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