#1
Hi there, first time in the MT forum, and I'm having a problem with understanding Harmonization. I'll try to explain with an example, as I'm no good with words.

My example is in the key of A Major.

The first guitar plays the E at the 9th fret of the G string.
The second guitar plays the B at the 9th fret of the D string.

If the E is the 5th Interval, and the B is the 2nd. They would be three Intervals apart:

A Major: A B C# D E F# G#
Intervals Pattern: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Would this be classed as a 3rd Third Interval harmonization? Or should I use the B/E as the root note and go from there?

E.g.

E Major: E F# G# A B C# D#
Intervallic Pattern: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Making this a 5th Interval harmonization?

Thanks for any help you could give me, guys (and girls. ).

EDIT: The problem is not a question of B to E or E to B per se, but whether the example being in A Major would change anything with B and E not being the Root note.
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 27, 2008,
#2
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Well, E to B is a minor third, regardless of how you look at it, if that's any consolation.

So I could call it a Minor Third Harmonization and get away with it?
I'm just trying to figure it out, as in the key of E Major, the B would be the 5th. Thank you for your response though.
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#3
^ what? E to B is a perfect 5th. B to E is a fourth.

TS, what you're playing is a diad, its hard to say without a doubt that its a inverted 5th as we don't know it in context but i would bet that its a 5th inversion voicing an E
#4
Quote by Arpeggio X
Hi there, first time in the MT forum


Quote by Arpeggio Y
If the E is the 5th Interval, and the B is the 2nd. They would be three Intervals apart:

A Major: A B C# D E F# G#
Intervals Pattern: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Would this be classed as a 3rd Third Interval harmonization? Or should I use the B/E as the root note and go from there?

You're right to think that you include the B; B up to an E is a perfect fourth. When counting intervals, you take the root as 1, so C# would be a second, D a third, and E a fourth. Make any sense?

E.g.

Quote by Arpeggio Z
E Major: E F# G# A B C# D#
Intervallic Pattern: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Making this a 5th Interval harmonization?

Thanks for any help you could give me, guys (and girls. ).

If you're wondering if E to B is a perfect fifth, you are correct to think so.
#6
To the great z4twenny, the context:
My example comes from the harmonized riff in "The Boys Are Back In Town" by Thin Lizzy. (Which is why the key for the example is A Major as opposed to E/B.)
Would the example being in the key of A Major change anything?

I'm using this to explain harmonization to my friend, as I've put together a music theory crash course for him. I just thought I'd consult the MT forum about the things I didn't quite understand myself in order to make sure I understood the concept perfectly before trying to teach anything.
Your posts have helped me a lot when I have been lurking these past few years.

I'm thinking I've been musically retarded here, as I completely forgot about the Intervals repeating themselves due to the octave.
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 27, 2008,