#1
Doing a satire course in english and I have to work out the satire being put forward in this poem by Bruuce Daawe: (I don't belive there is any satire)

Teh Muesum Attendanyt - Brucce Dawwe

From the cannon’s bell-like mouth
he took the last gruffness of colonels,
the choked shouts of artillery-officers,
and the moist gaze of generals watching telescopes
on nearby hills.

From the eighteenth-century muskets
he took the gallant puffs of smoke,
the bright colours of picture-books,
The huzzas of troops advancing
into the crackling witch-fire
of the new century, storming the museums,
and the regimental mess-halls,
their clean-razored faces
lit with mystique.

From the sabre and the broadsword
he wiped clean the cries of French noblemen, the red oaths of Scots,
lured from its hole the torpid serpent of light
which lives in cold steel, fills cradles and empties them,
bites out the grown life and into the blood of nations
sinks its deep poisons.

And from the twentieth-century cases
he took the clicking, the chattering,
the rapid-fire new words, the calibres,
Schmeisser and Luger and Bofors and Juki and Sten,
MI, MI6, M60, 7.62, .50, AK47
and most of all he took the sheen in the eyes of those children
who came every week every month every year
to breathe on the glass, to leave their perfect little sets of finger-prints
all over silence
before moving on to the Minerals Section,
considerably hushed, as if understanding
what it was they had seen in the room
in the eyes of their elders.

Thanks!
Last edited by tyler_j at Aug 27, 2008,
#4
i dont really read much satire there either. it doesnt seem to be mocking the musieum attendant at all. i think the satire is on the twentieth century children, who are so out of touch with the history that they are seeing. maybe the evidence is in the "perfect" fingerprints and the speed at which they go through it. it seems as though the attendant is out of touch, because he seems to think it affects them more than the narrator does.

tough one. good luck.
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I have no opinion on this matter.
#6
Isn't it obvious? It's a stab at the attendant.

Quote by Zugunruhe
i dont really read much satire there either. it doesnt seem to be mocking the musieum attendant at all. i think the satire is on the twentieth century children, who are so out of touch with the history that they are seeing. maybe the evidence is in the "perfect" fingerprints and the speed at which they go through it. it seems as though the attendant is out of touch, because he seems to think it affects them more than the narrator does.

tough one. good luck.


Applies to the attendant as well.

It could also be bringing in the idea that in comparison to the children the attendant is stuck in time, in his world of the museum...which is another way of having a go at him I suppose.

Overall it could be a satire of the modern perspective of time? Dude, do some reading. Think about things for a while.
if you have belief in ur soul and jesus you can do anything
Last edited by greety at Aug 27, 2008,
#7
It's not what I would call greatly satirical. It's good but a tad weak.
It could be a jab at how the attendant cleans these images of war and destruction, and how the children "leave their perfect little sets of finger-prints" over the glass displays of violent and destructive images and then are off to the minerals section, away from such harsh realities.