#1
Hi, my band now have 5 songs and we want to record 4 of them, (we have a speacial microphone so we don't need gear advice), this is how we want to record them:

-we roughly record the songs on guitar.
-we meet up witht he drummer, show him the drums, he then writes the drum parts and we record them.
- We then listen to the drums and rerecord the guitar because now thanks to the drums we can keep the rhythm, we recprd rhythm guitar and then the lead.
-we then add piano if there is any and finnaly add the vocals.

- would this work??

any advice would be aprciated.
#2
hmm it would work but this is generally how i would do it

record with guitar and drums at the same time
then record the drums
then record bass so it can get as close as possible in time
then the guitar

or

drum to a metronome first
#4
Quote by thedefrockednun
Hi, my band now have 5 songs and we want to record 4 of them, (we have a speacial microphone so we don't need gear advice), this is how we want to record them:

-we roughly record the songs on guitar.
-we meet up witht he drummer, show him the drums, he then writes the drum parts and we record them.
- We then listen to the drums and rerecord the guitar because now thanks to the drums we can keep the rhythm, we recprd rhythm guitar and then the lead.
-we then add piano if there is any and finnaly add the vocals.

- would this work??

any advice would be aprciated.


I'd suggest to record the first guitars and the drums with a click track, if you weren't going to do that in the first place. Otherwise the timing will get screwed up. I don't know about your gear but you're not going to get good quality with just one microphone. You need already multiple mics for the drums.
#5
we ave a microphone designed to be good for ALL instruments, 'twas 60 something dollars. it's working well.
#6
Okay, you can go with that if the sound quality with that mic pleases you. What kind of other recording gear you have?
#7
Quote by thedefrockednun
we ave a microphone designed to be good for ALL instruments, 'twas 60 something dollars. it's working well.


There's no mic for "All instruments"...
Some mics work in many different settings, (like the SM57) however you really need to pic a mic for the job. IMO

$60 isnt a high end mic, any brand or other info on it?
#8
Sure it'll work. You'll spend a lot of tiem recording things again though. Use a metronome with the guitars find one with an earplug option and split the signal between you both. I prefer to record the whole band straight and mic'd then go back in and clean up ambiants and reflected noise, get a pretty good mix, and then do the vocals again and any edits on the insturments. Why? A lot of times I find there's a certain magic a band has when it performs together that gets lost when everything's recorded totally seperate. It gives me a better idea of what the bands really after and what I need do to capture 'their' sound for the demo. The best way to learn what's best for you is to study everything you can get your hands on about recording and then experiment. You have to start with mic placement and dealing with reflected noise. Mixing is like learning a whole new instrument, and if you plan to burn a CD from your computer without a quality sound card, you'll be disappointed. If you go to your neighborhood home studio guy to mix/master it and cut a demo, ask him if he has any examples of his work you can listen to. I find a lot of home studio mixes sound 'muddy'. That said, there are some really talented people doing studio work at home and they can actually turn out as quality a product as a 'professional' studio, ya just gotta find them.
R7, SG, Texas Special
EMG modded special addition Fat Strat
BC Rich STIII
Zinky Blue Velvet
MF350
AkaiDPS24MKII
GNX3, PA
other pedals and gear
#9
Quote by thedefrockednun
we ave a microphone designed to be good for ALL instruments, 'twas 60 something dollars. it's working well.


a single mic? just one? i hope you plan on having the drummer record each percussion instrument individually (mic the snare, record, mic the kick, record, mic the hi hat record etc) as one mic is going to sound awful trying to record and entire drum kit at once. just my 2 cents though.
#10
I would suggest the met going with an instrument first. (preferably the drums) Then layer everything else after that.

I would also suggest getting a full drum mic set up. If thats not possible then at least two mics. One on kick and one overhead centered above the snare/mounted toms. If you have to go with one mic well....good luck.

if you dont take anything else away from this well....


USE A MET

-Ryan
#11
Quote by thedefrockednun
we ave a microphone designed to be good for ALL instruments, 'twas 60 something dollars. it's working well.


Different tools for different jobs - the old tradesman's motto.

I'd sound pretty silly saying I have one screwdriver that's designed to be good for all screws, right? One saw that's good for sawing all things?

Of course. Just like there are many different types of screwdrivers and many different kinds of saws for a perfectly good reason, there are many different kinds of mics, and they all work on some things better than others.

And there is also a very good reason why some of those tools are considerably more expensive than others. When it comes to microphones, $60 is cheap, cheap, cheap. I'm not saying it's crap necessarily. I'm just saying not to expect miracles.

I *could* use a slot screwdriver in a Phillips head, but it would be really fiddly. I *could* use a skill saw to cut a keyhole in my door, but it'd sure 'nuff make a huge botch of it. I *could* even use a hammer to drive in a Phillips screw.

I *could* use a small diaphragm condensor for kick drum, but I'd probably end up wrecking it. I *could* use a large diaphragm dynamic mic for a drum overhead, but it'd sound pretty muddy. I *could* use an SM58 to record a vocal, but I try to avoid it when I can.

What I would do in your situation...

Have someone play the acoustic part on an electric guitar plugged straight into the board, and send it to the drummer's headphones. This way, you won't hear the guitar in the room when you want to record the drums.

Guitar and drums play together, recording only drums, but capturing 'feel' of a live performance.

Then record guitar over top.

From my experience, having a drummer lay down a track where s/he needs to follow another part is an exercise in mediocrity and frustration. It never feels right. The reason is that the drummer leads, not follows. Avoid forcing the drummer to follow if you can avoid it at all.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Aug 28, 2008,