#1
I understand the whole concept of figuring out the key of your chord progression, and playing your solo in the matching key. But then I started thinking about it more, and maybe I'm looking too deep into it. Say my chord progression is D5, C5, and E5 power chords. As the D5 chord is being played, I'm soloing over it in any given scale in the key of D. My question is, after I switch to the C5 chord, I switch my solo to the key of C? And the same for every chord switch I'm guessing. So if you have a really fast chord progression that switches very quick, how do you keep switching keys in your solo to match the chord? Or is it considered fine to be playing a solo that doesn't match the key of your chords? Some help please.
#2
you dont have to play the scale of the chord you're playing. the chord progression is going to be in a certain key. Lets say D in this case. go to the tenth fret low e string and just start messing around with the box blues scale or pentatonic (whatever you use) and you will start to understand the answer to your question. what you really want to do is record a backing track of those chords and then jam over it.
#3
i'm pretty sure you just have to find the common key.
you find one note that is each of the chords,
and then use that note to determine what the root of your scale will be.
however, i'm not that good at it myself.
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#4
You should (basically, the theory goes deeper) play in the key your song is in.
Your song isn't written in 6 different keys if there are 6 chords.
Let's take your example
D5, C5 and E5
The notes you're playing there are D, A, C, G, E and B.
The key of your song will most probabely be G or C (with of course the starting tone somewhere else depending on the song, most ppb on D or E)
So if those are the chords, both a solo in G or C will sound good. If you can avoid hitting the F or F sharp you'll keep it more open and it's also easyer. If you want to hit the F or F sharp it can add to your song, though it can be harder to do well.
#5
Quote by iburnmyfrendz66
i'm pretty sure you just have to find the common key.
you find one note that is each of the chords,
and then use that note to determine what the root of your scale will be.
however, i'm not that good at it myself.

He's using 3 different powerchords, the root can be anywhere xD
Just listen to what's played on the emphasized (sorry, lack of a better word) beats.
#6
The solo section in "Purple Haze" is basically ||: E5 | F#5 D5 :||

While not completetly implied, the sound lends itself to becoming ||: Em | F#m D :||

That is why the E dorian mode seems to work. E serves as the "tone center" and the other chords provide some motion. In your case, I would consider the D dorian scale as a start. But, your ears have to be the final judge.

rev
#7
Just go up a scale on each fret quickly whilst the chords are playing, you'll be able to tell when it's in the right key. Obviously you need to use your intuition. Make sure it's a related scale though (e.g. don't be using a blues scale over a sad or minor-orientated song).
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#9
There are lots of things you could do over powerchords. For example, say youre playing over E5. By throwing a g# in the solo, youve formed a major chord, flat the g# to a g and you have a minor chord sound. Throw in a g# with a d# and you have a maj7th sound, or a c# instead of d# and you have a maj6. Throw a d in there and you have a dom7th. There are so many things you can do over power chords its not even funny. Arpeggios are your friend in this case, big time.

An example of what Ive just mentioned would be Metallica's Nothing Else Matters solo. Im not big into Metallica or anything, but they make great use of this.
#10
Quote by boxcharles
I understand the whole concept of figuring out the key of your chord progression, and playing your solo in the matching key. But then I started thinking about it more, and maybe I'm looking too deep into it. Say my chord progression is D5, C5, and E5 power chords. As the D5 chord is being played, I'm soloing over it in any given scale in the key of D. My question is, after I switch to the C5 chord, I switch my solo to the key of C? And the same for every chord switch I'm guessing. So if you have a really fast chord progression that switches very quick, how do you keep switching keys in your solo to match the chord? Or is it considered fine to be playing a solo that doesn't match the key of your chords? Some help please.



There's always a scale. In this case, let's say major scale. To build any major scale, you need to follow the intervals starting on the first/root note (which names the scale). There intervals go WWHWWWH (Whole step, Half step). So for D major scale, it would go like this:

D E F# G A B C#


Now, out of this pool of notes, you can build many, many many chords! How are chords built? By taking some notes and playing them. Now, powerchords (fifth chords) require the root (1) and the fifth(5) note from their own major scale. So, if you were to build a C5, you would need to have the C note and the G note. You have them both in the D major scale. To make this easier, there's an approach using modes.

To get a mode, basicly start the major scale at any other degree except of the 1. Let's say, 6.

D E F# G A B C#

B C# D E F# G A

Now compare it to the original B major scale. In order to transform the original B major scale into this one, you have to do the following: flat the 3rd, 5th and 7th.

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7


Do it starting on every note. Now let's see which chord can be built by using the 6th degree as the root of the CHORD. You can build a sus2 (1-2-5), sus4 (1-4-5), fifth (1-5), minor chord (1-b3-5), minor 7th (1-b3-5-7).

I hope I made it a bit clearer. If I haven't, ask what you need.

If you do the above work well, you should come to the conclusion (for the chords):

I ii iii IV V vi vii

I, IV, V - major
ii, iii, vi - minor
vii - diminished.

EDIT: Oh and yeah. When soloing, it's usual to stay in the native scale, but use the notes depending on which sound you'd like to achieve. Stop on the notes that are in your chords, they will resolve the solo. You can get different moods by emphasizing different intervals of a scale.

Have a good day.

felix
"The end result - the music - is all that counts"
Last edited by felixdcat at Aug 28, 2008,
#11
Soloing over the chords individually like that tends to sound somewhat disjointed, it's usually better, and certainly easier, to find the key of the song and choose a scale accordingly. By all means use the chords to guide you as to which notes of the scale to focus on though, that's an important skill to develop.
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