#1
I know there's the palm mute technique to sound like an upright, but otherwise, what tone/scales/tricks are expected with classic country like Hank Williams? Most things I hear are painfully simple, which is what I do, but it feels inadequate when I play with people. Guess I can't play like Flea to the song "dinosaur" though.
#2
Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Conway Twitty.

Anyway, the palm muting is going to be very good technique for this kind of stuff. Other than that, country is mostly 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 ad nauseum as far as the bass goes. It's all very simple stuff that lays down a basic chord progression and rhythm. That's your place as a bassist. For tone, you'll just want a bassy, yet tight sound. Use a lot of neck pickup.
#3
just play what you hear... you obviously dont hear slaps and fast laser notes in older country music .. you hear slower smooth sounding notes.. just turn your tone knob down
#4
I was playing in a country band. the leader guy was always on me about tone. I used a very bright growly tone, and he wanted me to tone down and not be so loud. so I compromised, and found out a great trick. you can keep your punch in country if you drop the low mids, drop the trebles, boost your bass, and give the high mids a little bit extra.

so for a country tone in classics like jambalaya and folsom prison blues, that doesn't, like every other country tone I've heard, sound like crap, do the above. it isn't exact, but it sounds better.
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#5
Quote by the humanity
I was playing in a country band. the leader guy was always on me about tone. I used a very bright growly tone, and he wanted me to tone down and not be so loud. so I compromised, and found out a great trick. you can keep your punch in country if you drop the low mids, drop the trebles, boost your bass, and give the high mids a little bit extra.

so for a country tone in classics like jambalaya and folsom prison blues, that doesn't, like every other country tone I've heard, sound like crap, do the above. it isn't exact, but it sounds better.


I already kind of do that, most all the time, even on rock. I totally kill my low mids and boost my high mids alot on my GK 1001 amp, while keeping treble and bass about 2/3 of the way up. It may not be historically accurate but I've got to make it a little interesting.
#6
If I remember correctly there is a Waylon Jennings song about electric bass called Clyde.
You should check it out.
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Conway Twitty.

Anyway, the palm muting is going to be very good technique for this kind of stuff. Other than that, country is mostly 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 ad nauseum as far as the bass goes. It's all very simple stuff that lays down a basic chord progression and rhythm. That's your place as a bassist. For tone, you'll just want a bassy, yet tight sound. Use a lot of neck pickup.


Aw, I prefer. "Hello.....I'm Johnny Cash".

To add to Bales comment, I would also recommend using a Pbass with a set of flatwounds. And yes, there is a alot leaning on the fifth, though you'll find that some early country tends to deploy rather nice walk ups and down along with some decent boogie woogie lines as well. Learn some simple walking bass lines as well.
#8
^flats are definetly the way to go, then you can always hangout at a Reggae bar afterwards to flush out the country
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Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#9
I thought palm muting was on guitar, and the bass was playing the same thing only in a lower octave.
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#11
Ooo Patsy Cline. I don't get emotional on most songs, but she always makes me teary eyed.

Back on topic. Check out some mid-career Hank Williams, Johnny Cash (esp. Cocaine Blues, which does the R-5th and some rather nice walking bass run ups and down). Also, check out Railroad Earth, who do a more Grateful Dead spin on country and have some interesting lines.

There is also swing based country, check out Tex Williams. For more boogie based lines, early to mid career Tennessee Ernie Ford (avoid his 1960s output, its a bit schlocky). Also if you can find anything by the Delmore brothers, they are fun as hell to play. Their song "Blues Stay Away From Me" is considered another contender for the first rock and roll record.