Poll: do you know what notes you play individually (not chords)?
Poll Options
View poll results: do you know what notes you play individually (not chords)?
yes
13 54%
no
11 46%
other
0 0%
Voters: 24.
#1
so i know the notes of the 5th and 6th string (including 1st)

is there a quick way to memorize the other notes all over the neck?

should i even learn what notes i play?
#2
It's not that hard to figure it out. If you know what the open string is.
You can call me Aaron.


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#3
i know the open strings but i dont want to go A B C D E F G until i get to the note im playing

i wish i just knew that the 9 th fret was E without the counting
what are some things to memorize my way around the neck?
#4
Not entirely sure if I'm answering your question as you asked it, but some ways I sed are:

Eat All Day Get Big Easy (A mnemonic for remembering the order of the strings)

The fifth fret of a string (fourth fret for G) is the same note as the open string below it

The seventh fret is the same note as the open string above it (eighth for B)

Twelfth fret is an octave
#5
Quote by chris88kolate
i know the open strings but i dont want to go A B C D E F G until i get to the note im playing

i wish i just knew that the 9 th fret was E without the counting
what are some things to memorize my way around the neck?


an easy thing to do is the 5th fret of a string is gonna be the same note as the next string open(except on the 4th and 5th string). the 10th fret of one string is the 3rd fret of the next one, so you can just remember those and count from there, after doin for like a week or two it becomes second-nature.
You can call me Aaron.


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Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#6
Quote by biga29
an easy thing to do is the 5th fret of a string is gonna be the same note as the next string open(except on the 4th and 5th string). the 10th fret of one string is the 5th fret of the next one, so you can just remember those and count from there, after doin for like a week or two it becomes second-nature.


fixed

Also, "Other"? You either know what note you are playing or you don't
Stop whining and learn your theory!

Quote by oddhawk676
Yeah, some black guy with a yankees cap walks into the ice cream parlor, and I said "We dont serve your kind here," as in, yankee fans, i guess he thought something else and left.
#7
Quote by PekarGuitar
fixed

Also, "Other"? You either know what note you are playing or you don't



Yeh i meant the 10th fret of a string is the octave of the 3rd fret of the string before it....im tired and dont have a guitar in front of m

what are talking about "other"?
You can call me Aaron.


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Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#8
I'm talking about the poll at the top of the thread
Stop whining and learn your theory!

Quote by oddhawk676
Yeah, some black guy with a yankees cap walks into the ice cream parlor, and I said "We dont serve your kind here," as in, yankee fans, i guess he thought something else and left.
#10
I can tell you the note on a specific fret if you give me like 3 seconds... but I cant play a furry of notes and know which each of them are
86% of the people who frequent the "Electric Guitar" forum would say that they have played guitar for under 5 years.
#11
1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
Actually called Mark!

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