#1
Not sure if I spelled it right, but yeah, I've been on this 'plateau' for a whileeeee. lol
I've been playing for about 3 years and some change and I feel like I'm just playing the same stuff over and over again. I'm not, but it feels that way. Whenever I improvise I feel like I'm just playing the same phrases/licks/riffs. Can anyone help me?
#2
Maybe try learning a different style to learn some new licks? Like you play a lotta rock and metal, try some blues/jazz/funk?
XBL Gamertag: toasty10
#3
Take a scale and key that you don't play in very often, and try improvising in that. For example, if you spend a lot of time in Em while improvising, try D harmonic minor. Or anything, as long as it's a bit unfamiliar. This can help you bust out of your rut and open up some new mental pathways.
#5
you are probably spending time in the same scale, and not playing with any new harmonies or rythms. Odds are if you plateaud that you have not messed around with harmonies very much, I bought a loop station so I can play harmonies with out someone else, best investment i ever made. Once you understand the relationships different chords have against one another everything changes, if you can think in chords as opposed to melodies, even when you're playing melodies things open up a lot.
#6
Quote by rudiecantfail92
Not sure if I spelled it right, but yeah, I've been on this 'plateau' for a whileeeee. lol
I've been playing for about 3 years and some change and I feel like I'm just playing the same stuff over and over again. I'm not, but it feels that way. Whenever I improvise I feel like I'm just playing the same phrases/licks/riffs. Can anyone help me?


to be honest, 3 years is not a long time over your whole music lifetime, and if you look at any successful guitar player and how they changed over time, usually they evolve very slowly....

I tend to think that because the pace of learning and growth is so quick in the first 2-3 years of playing an instrument (because you're starting from nothing), that you come to expect to make huge leaps forward in your playing for ever.... but as you've found, you come to start to feel you've plateau'd...

as long as you continue to listen to different artists and take inspiration wherever you can find it, you WILL continue to develop, just not at the same frenetic 'newbie' pace of the 1st couple of years

are you in a band that plays gigs? if you are, you're probably evolving in very positive ways even if you're not aware of it...
out of here
#7
Quote by inflatablefilth

I tend to think that because the pace of learning and growth is so quick in the first 2-3 years of playing an instrument (because you're starting from nothing), that you come to expect to make huge leaps forward in your playing for ever.... but as you've found, you come to start to feel you've plateau'd...


I agree with this. Almost every "plateau", "I've hit a wall", "I'm stuck", "Where do
I go now?", etc... post is from someone who's been playing 2-5 years.

Another critical thing is that your practice skills haven't kept pace with your playing
skills. At first, you can't but help to make progress as you start from nothing.
Not only does progress slow eventually, it slows EVEN MORE if your practice
skills are shabby. Ultimately how you practice is the only way to insure steady
progress. But, it still gets slower than it seemed at first and you have to mentally
accept it.