#1
I'm making another strat but with a mahogany neck should it be quartersawn would it be ok if it was not?
#2
no it does not have to be quartersawn, and here is why. The neck has all of its stress in the longitudinal direction (the grain going from the headstock to the body) and wood is the strongest in that direction. Using quartersawn lumber versus flatsawn lumber would only vary the direction of the grain widthwise on the neck (quartersawn lumber will have grain that forms an angle between 45 to 90 degrees to the fret board, whereas flatsawn lumber will have grain bewtween 0 and 44 degrees to the fretboard.) so the only thing having quartersawn lumber will do for you on the neck is make the neck look better and drain your wallot more. Quartersawn lumber is considered more valuable because large ray flecks are formed on the radial direction (easily visable in oak) and are very good looking, and lumber shrinks and swells less in the radial direction.

EDIT: i have an associates in Wood Products technology and working on a bachelors, if you were wondering where this information is coming from.
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#3
Quote by Eldiablo30x6
no it does not have to be quartersawn, and here is why. The neck has all of its stress in the longitudinal direction (the grain going from the headstock to the body) and wood is the strongest in that direction. Using quartersawn lumber versus flatsawn lumber would only vary the direction of the grain widthwise on the neck (quartersawn lumber will have grain that forms an angle between 45 to 90 degrees to the fret board, whereas flatsawn lumber will have grain bewtween 0 and 44 degrees to the fretboard.) so the only thing having quartersawn lumber will do for you on the neck is make the neck look better and drain your wallot more. Quartersawn lumber is considered more valuable because large ray flecks are formed on the radial direction (easily visable in oak) and are very good looking, and lumber shrinks and swells less in the radial direction.

thanks, I've got plenty of flatsawn mahogany I could use but no quartersawn just wanted to make sure before I'm all done with it and it doesn't work right.
#4
Quartersawn mahogany is less likely to twist and bow due to climate change. Flatsawn mahogany is still more stable than quarter sawn maple. Quarter swan maple is more stable than flatsawn maple, and fender makes nearly all of their necks with flatsawn maple.

To sum it all up, there are good reasons to use quarter sawn mahogany for a neck but flatsawn is still going to work just fine.

Quote by Eldiablo30x6
no it does not have to be quartersawn, and here is why. The neck has all of its stress in the longitudinal direction (the grain going from the headstock to the body) and wood is the strongest in that direction. Using quartersawn lumber versus flatsawn lumber would only vary the direction of the grain widthwise on the neck (quartersawn lumber will have grain that forms an angle between 45 to 90 degrees to the fret board, whereas flatsawn lumber will have grain bewtween 0 and 44 degrees to the fretboard.) so the only thing having quartersawn lumber will do for you on the neck is make the neck look better and drain your wallot more. Quartersawn lumber is considered more valuable because large ray flecks are formed on the radial direction (easily visable in oak) and are very good looking, and lumber shrinks and swells less in the radial direction.

EDIT: i have an associates in Wood Products technology and working on a bachelors, if you were wondering where this information is coming from.


Have you read understanding wood? Your answer disagrees with a lot of the tests performed in that book.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Aug 28, 2008,
#5
Quote by CorduroyEW
Have you read understanding wood? Your answer disagrees with a lot of the tests performed in that book.



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alright, this post is more or less just spam but i've been waiting for ages to get a chance to use that pic
#6
I have a question- if you have a flat sawn plank of wood that's wide enough, couldn't you just split it in twain and turn it into two "quartersawn" neck blanks?

Like such:


To me it seems like it'd be the same...
#7
If you are unsure you can always laminate the mahogany, either to its self or to other woods to make it more stable.


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#8
^Yeah, I was planning on doing that whenever I actually get started... I'll probably do laminated necks exclusively. But I was just wondering if my notion above was correct.
#9
Quote by Pikka Bird
I have a question- if you have a flat sawn plank of wood that's wide enough, couldn't you just split it in twain and turn it into two "quartersawn" neck blanks?

Like such:


To me it seems like it'd be the same...



Yes

Quote by seljer
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alright, this post is more or less just spam but i've been waiting for ages to get a chance to use that pic


LOL

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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Aug 28, 2008,