#1
I've been playing for about six months now and I'm looking to improve my soloing. I can hold my own from a technical standpoint but I'm trying to broaden the range of notes that I play. For example when I'm jamming with my friends now I find myself limited to just one scale correspondig to a particular key, such as the G major scale. I play through different positions in the scale but I'm trying to find tips on how to break away from that boring scale pattern, and also create licks that use up more of the fretboard (for example being able to create descending licks that use more notes than the major scale alone includes before having to go back up the neck) I've heard about triads but I'm not really sure what those are. Any help is appreciated.
#2
Learn pentatonic scales and try learning different kinds of scales. Learn these scales so it becomes second nature and then get a backing track in the style you want. This will help your improvising. Also, practice is crucial to both of what you want to improve.
#4
Make sure you learn to move ACROSS your scales, as well as up and down. Just last week I realised by improv was based way too much in a vertical mode and started to use more linear playing. And I've been playing for 8 years!
#5
Quote by Double
I've been playing for about six months now and I'm looking to improve my soloing. I can hold my own from a technical standpoint but I'm trying to broaden the range of notes that I play. For example when I'm jamming with my friends now I find myself limited to just one scale correspondig to a particular key, such as the G major scale. I play through different positions in the scale but I'm trying to find tips on how to break away from that boring scale pattern, and also create licks that use up more of the fretboard (for example being able to create descending licks that use more notes than the major scale alone includes before having to go back up the neck) I've heard about triads but I'm not really sure what those are. Any help is appreciated.


Triads are chords built by stacking diatonic thirds on a root note from the scale.

Try repeating phrases that change with each repetition. This builds familiarity through the repetition and an expectation in the listener as to where it goes next since they just heard the phrase but when you vary the ending it is a surprise and it feels as though you are moving forward. Listen for this in solo's and you'll notice it all over the place.

Also try just a repeated three or four note lick. This is usually a crowd pleaser because it is so easy to follow and sustains tension or prolongs the tonic feel listen for this type of thing in solo's also and you'll see it's a very common trick.

Learn some scale runs then try playing the run starting from the same starting place and ending on the same end note but mix up the order in between. Try it lots of different ways. When you have something you like try adding in some in between notes as passing notes. in the run and you might have to play around to find good places for the in between notes.

Build an aresenal of licks that you like and play around with variations of them and watch them evolve into something new each time you play with it.

I honestly don't see the point in learning a whole bunch more scales. It will give you a bunch more scales but won't help you use them. Learn to use the Major Scale better and better. Many guitarists will stay in one key and one scale their entire career it's mind blowing how seven notes can create an infinite number of possibilities.


Good Luck
Si
#6
One tip is not to see the scale as boxes or positions on the neck, but quite simply as a list of notes around the neck that fit in with the key. That was a problem I used to have, but then I changed the way I view the scale and started to find positions between my usual positions and I started to integrate the positions with each other, instead of playing a lick in one position, changing position, and playing the next lick.

Also, it's not uncommon for players to play "wrong" notes when playing faster. EVH does quite often.
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#7
One place man : www.jguitar.com

It's my brain.

No, seriously though, it's really hard to say. Like the guy above was saying, most of the time, there really is just no reason to move around THAT much.

I've mostly found that I tend to use pentatonic scales and the other ones usually don't flow as well. As much as I want to learn more, I have to play what sounds better, otherwise.. what's the point? When I ask JGuitar what scales are compatible with a progression starting with the C chord, look how many options we receive.

C Ionian
F Ionian
G Ionian
D Dorian
G Dorian
A Dorian
E Phrygian
A Phrygian
B Phrygian
C Lydian
F Lydian
A# Lydian
C Mixolydian
D Mixolydian
G Mixolydian
D Aeolian
E Aeolian
A Aeolian
E Locrian
F# Locrian
B Locrian
F Melodic Minor
G Melodic Minor
G Phrygian #6
A Phrygian #6
G# Lydian Augmented
A# Lydian Augmented
C Lydian Dominant
A# Lydian Dominant
C Fifth Mode
D Fifth Mode
D Locrian #2
E Locrian #2
E Altered
F# Altered
C# Diminished Whole Half
E Diminished Whole Half
G Diminished Whole Half
A# Diminished Whole Half
C Diminished Half Whole
D# Diminished Half Whole
F# Diminished Half Whole
A Diminished Half Whole
C Major Pentatonic
A Minor Pentatonic
D Suspended Pentatonic
A Blues
C Bebop Major
F Bebop Major
G Bebop Major
G# Bebop Major
C Bebop Minor
D Bebop Minor
G Bebop Minor
A Bebop Minor
C Bebop Dominant
D Bebop Dominant
F Bebop Dominant
G Bebop Dominant
E Bebop Melodic Minor
F Bebop Melodic Minor
G Bebop Melodic Minor
C Harmonic Major
F Harmonic Major
G# Harmonic Major
E Harmonic Minor
F Harmonic Minor
C Double Harmonic Major
G# Double Harmonic Major
B Double Harmonic Major
C# Hungarian Gypsy
E Hungarian Gypsy
F Hungarian Gypsy
C Hungarian Major
A Hungarian Major
C Phrygian Dominant
B Phrygian Dominant
E Neapolitan Minor
B Neapolitan Minor
G Neapolitan Major
F# Enigmatic
G# Enigmatic
E Eight-tone Spanish
F# Eight-tone Spanish
B Eight-tone Spanish
E Balinese Pelog
D# Oriental
F# Oriental
G Oriental
F# Iwato
G Yo
A# Prometheus
E Symmetrical
G Symmetrical
B Symmetrical
D Major Locrian
C Augmented
E Augmented
G# Augmented
C Lydian Minor

Most of the time, I definitely stick to vertical solo'ing (just one scale pattern, not moving linear) however sometimes it is necessary to move linear and I do that as well. However, all those scales listed there, like, it's hard to implement all of those in one's music, especially if you play rock and roll, but you can try.
The times they are a changin'.....