#1
Are augmented chords used in classical (orchestral) music? And do you have to include the dominant seventh with them? Thanks!
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#2
For my input, I have no knowledge on classical use of an augmented chord, but I imagine it's used rarely. In contemporary music, you don't 'have' to do anything, I sometimes play augmented triads which sound fine. In a minor progression, an augmented seventh chord gives great resolution though.

EDIT: Googled, an "Italian chord: ibreathemusic Forums
They have a discussion on the use of Italian, French, and German sixth chords, which are used for voice leading. Not sure if this helps.

And I'm sorry if that's considered third party, I just googled it. I'll remove it if anyone tells me to.
Last edited by st.stephen at Aug 28, 2008,
#3
they are used when needed in classical, i wouldnt say rarely, but full of them
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#4
nah, augmented chords aren't used often in classical music. and no, you don't have to include a seventh note. an augmented chord is by definition root - major third - augmented fifth
#5
I don't know if it's use a lot in classical music. But you don't need the 7th. Just the first, augmented third (I think) and Augmented 5th
#6
Okay thanks! I'm currently writing an orchestral piece in E Spanish Phrygian, and I use a Caug here and there.
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
Rivera S-120
'60s PEPCO Model 211 5w head
'60s Paul (Pepco) 1x12 tube amp
'60s Harmony H303a 1x10 tube amp
#7
not in classical music, if you're using the term 'classical' in the strictest sense

but late romantic/early 20th century composers often made use of augmented chords & whole tone scales... Debussy's impressionistic strokes of watery expansiveness in 'La Mer' uses that kind of tonality... and the Russian-influenced harmonies of Stravinsky's 'Rite of Spring' also use augmented chords all over the place... Schoenberg, Bartok, Webern... augmented triads all over the place
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#8
Quote by st.stephen
For my input, I have no knowledge on classical use of an augmented chord, but I imagine it's used rarely. In contemporary music, you don't 'have' to do anything, I sometimes play augmented triads which sound fine. In a minor progression, an augmented seventh chord gives great resolution though.

EDIT: Googled, an "Italian chord: ibreathemusic Forums
They have a discussion on the use of Italian, French, and German sixth chords, which are used for voice leading. Not sure if this helps.

And I'm sorry if that's considered third party, I just googled it. I'll remove it if anyone tells me to.


Be careful to not confuse augmented chords with Augmented sixth chords.

The augmented chord consists of a root, major third, and augmented fifth, as we know.

An augmented sixth chord contains the interval of an augmented sixth. This is enharmonic to a minor seventh, but the voice leading is different; where the minor 7th would normally resolve down, the augmented sixth resolves up. This chord usually acts as a predominant, and is one half step higher than the dominant.

So, for example, the Italian augmented sixth contains a root, major third, and augmented sixth. In the key of C, it would be Ab, C, and F# (remember, it's a half step above the dominant). Both the Ab and the F# would resolve to G, and the C would probably resolve to B.
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#10
Quote by RCalisto
^ according to wikipedia augmented sixth chords are 1 - #4 - b6


I gave the intervals in relation to the "root" of the Italian Augmented. Your intervals are correct relative to the key. Either way works, I suppose, depending on what you find easier.
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#11
Quote by psychodelia
Be careful to not confuse augmented chords with Augmented sixth chords.

The augmented chord consists of a root, major third, and augmented fifth, as we know.

An augmented sixth chord contains the interval of an augmented sixth. This is enharmonic to a minor seventh, but the voice leading is different; where the minor 7th would normally resolve down, the augmented sixth resolves up. This chord usually acts as a predominant, and is one half step higher than the dominant.

So, for example, the Italian augmented sixth contains a root, major third, and augmented sixth. In the key of C, it would be Ab, C, and F# (remember, it's a half step above the dominant). Both the Ab and the F# would resolve to G, and the C would probably resolve to B.

You're absolutely right, I was just googling for proof to back up my statement and I thought this was interesting and sort of relevant. I don't know enough about augmented sixth chords to be any use in a discussion, and now I see that I brought in an irrelevant element to the discussion, only confusing people.

EDIT:
Quote by psychodelia
I gave the intervals in relation to the "root" of the Italian Augmented. Your intervals are correct relative to the key. Either way works, I suppose, depending on what you find easier.

I re-read your analysis and I found the way you explained it, in relation to the root, easier to understand, and I compliment you on aiding me. Thanks
Last edited by st.stephen at Aug 28, 2008,
#12
I'm studying a mozart piece in school and theres an augmented chord used to bridge the gap in a key change
#13
Quote by st.stephen
You're absolutely right, I was just googling for proof to back up my statement and I thought this was interesting and sort of relevant. I don't know enough about augmented sixth chords to be any use in a discussion, and now I see that I brought in an irrelevant element to the discussion, only confusing people.

EDIT:
I re-read your analysis and I found the way you explained it, in relation to the root, easier to understand, and I compliment you on aiding me. Thanks


Sorry, mate; don't be too hard on yourself. I always assumed augmented sixth chords were augmented until I learned about them in class, and since these particular chords do appear in classical music, they aren't completely irrelevant to the topic.
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