#3
Id say both. If by proficient you mean good enough to play in a band (jazz band for bass), od say both. But proficient as in play in a band without sucking, bass i think. Modern bass seems to be pretty simple in most music styles, but i dont really play bass.
#4
once you get to a certain level they're not even comparable. thats like asking "who's better, vic wooten or paul gilbert"
#5
Depends on style. It also matters if you use a pick or fingers for bass, fingers take more time to build up but it pays off because 2 fingers at full speed can go faster than a pick at full speed.
#6
there really isnt a straight answer to that question, the two are just different
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#7
Just because you have to learn chords & some minor solo capability with guitar, I don't feel bad saying guitar is a bit more difficult, IN GENERAL. And I play both but mostly bass.
Guitar & Bass
#8
^ you should know how to do both with either instrument. arpeggiating chords in basslines sounds 100 x's better normally than just plonking the root of the chord over and over
#10
Quote by z4twenny
^ you should know how to do both with either instrument. arpeggiating chords in basslines sounds 100 x's better normally than just plonking the root of the chord over and over


Agree 100%. The key word here is "proficient", and you can get away with plunking the root on a whole lot of songs. You can't do that on the guitar.
Guitar & Bass
#11
Quote by The_Sophist
Which is harder to become proficient in?


out of curiosity....... why?

are you looking for the easy route, or are you looking to say you play the "harder" instrument ?

my advice:

play the one you are interested in..... because you like how it sounds n stuff.
which one is more difficult is irrelevant. and I agree btw with everyone that says they are equally challenging to become proficient at.
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#12
Quote by Hosscat
Agree 100%. The key word here is "proficient", and you can get away with plunking the root on a whole lot of songs. You can't do that on the guitar.


proficient is relative. what i consider proficient some people may consider excessive.
#13
to get "good" at any instrument you need to dedicate lots of time to it, and you must have lots of patience, and it will eventually pay off.

No matter what type of music you play, and what instrument you play...you can get away with playing simple stuff.

That being said, it's probably more common to see bassists play root notes over & over, and cause in the majority of popular music the bass doesn't often / never solo.

but if you want to "master" either of them, it will be a bitch, bass or guitar, it's hard to master any instrument.
#14
Depends on what you define proficent as... I think guitar has a bit of a steeper learning curve but in the end they are equal doing what john petrucci does and doing what victor wooten does is both impossible.
Referring to Victor Wooten
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#15
Quote by The_Sophist
Which is harder to become proficient in?


I play both, so I feel I'm well placed to comment...

generally (and it's a big 'generally') bass is easier conceptually... meaning that you're dealing with single notes and a limited note range.. you're also building your lines from the ground up, so simple is often best... you don't have to learn nearly as many 'instrument specific' things like chord shapes, you're not stomping on pedals all the time

oh, and on the bass you don't have a silly major 3rd spoiling the tuning symmetry

also, because it's generally used a supporting instrument, bass repertoire tends to be generally easier, certainly in blues and rock

bass is A LOT physically harder to play, due to the weight, size and higher string tension... my guitars feel like toys compared to my basses

you have to have more rhythmic discipline and a better sense of time to play bass... a guitarist who's a little bit sloppy can often make up for those shortcomings if their playing has character... but a bass player with poor timing..? no-one wants to know you

I think any instrument is as difficult as you want it to be, but to play rock music.... guitar is undeniably harder than bass... but that's due to repertoire, not instrument.... substitute 'jazz' for 'rock', and it's a different story

I think it's a lot easier to stand out as an excellent bass player than an excellent guitarist, because there are less bass players out there... it tends to be the instrument someone takes up if they just want to be in a band... i'd guess that a smaller percentage of people find bass too hard and give it up, because.. when you're a teenager you usually only have OWN a bass to get asked to join a band

I also think playing the bass well requires the ability to listen and react to the people around you, and this is a skill many guitarists could stand to work on

I think playing bass has made me a better guitar player, and playing guitar has made me a better bass player... and if everyone had the chance to do both and appreciate the different disciplines, there'd be no need to ask which was harder.. they'd know each is as hard as you make it
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Last edited by inflatablefilth at Aug 28, 2008,
#16
Quote by inflatablefilth
generally (and it's a big 'generally') bass is easier conceptually... meaning that you're dealing with single notes and a limited note range.. you're also building your lines from the ground up, so simple is often best... you don't have to learn nearly as many 'instrument specific' things like chord shapes, you're not stomping on pedals all the time

Most of the rest of your post was "meh" to me, but this I felt needed commenting.

I'm not an experienced bass player, but I know enough about the instrument and playing/ theory in general to speak for myself.

I disagree with your "instrument specific" examples, learning chord shapes would immensely help a bass player in finding relevant notes, same with learning advanced scale shapes and such. And the pedal comment was irrelevant, as both instruments can have as many pedals or as few as they need. Taking for lack of a better example Cliff Burton, who uses the wah pedal on "Pulling Teeth," alternately guitar players need little to no pedals to sound fine, achieving great sounds from solely their amp or guitar dynamics.

As for my part, they're both very different instruments and the only real thing they have in common is that they both have strings and they're both (traditionally at least) tuned very similarly. These facts cause many people to overlook the fact that they are very different instruments, and I often hear novice musicians saying "I play guitar so I can play bass as well."
#17
Quote by st.stephen
Most of the rest of your post was "meh" to me, but this I felt needed commenting.


look, just because you're smarting over being made to look silly on the 'augmented 6ths' thread doesn't mean you can spread your bad attitude over here... don't speak to me unless you can be civil
out of here
#18
^ he may have been pwned on a different thread but i agree with him to some degree. learning chord shapes and even * gasp * voice leading will make a good bassist out of a blah bassist. i play both bass and guitar and notice that i play bass differently than i play guitar so i base this off my own experience.
#19
Does it matter? No vs. threads.
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hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??