#1
So, i know the box shapes major/minor and pentatonic. Ive been mainly using those to solo and ya its quite limited. I recently learned how using arpeggios form the chords can make really melodic phrases for nice soloing. But now im trying to break out of the boxes. I can go quickly form box to box but i still see the scale as The box im in, the one to the left and the one to the right. Like i can't be playing 15th fret G pentatonic box and randomly slide down to the lower notes on the neck and play in the scale still, i gota connect the boxes and work my way down which becomes very repetitive because my playing always just box to box. So im trying to see the scale as a whole scale and not just boxes any advice for this
#2
practice them as scales and not boxes. it's almost like starting all over but its totally worth it
#3
Learn how to "see" some reference shapes of the scale on the neck. That way
you can visualize the scale on the neck easier. You'll be able to find spots on the
neck quickly without having to trace your path.

THE CAGED system is good for this, but you can really reduce it even further to
A E D. Basically if you visuallize where these 3 shapes are in the scale on the neck
(they are all triads for the same chord), it gives 3 fairly even subdivisions of 1
octave on the neck from which to start.
#4
^ + 1

i recommend also actually learning the notes on the fretboard, that will help you incredibly if you intend to get deeper into the instrument.
#6
ok well ive none about the cage chord to scale position relevance thing so i think ill go with that. How do i memorize all the notes on the fretboard this task seems too much. But ive been thinking about memorizing them because i intend to get even more in depth with the instrument so any tips for that? Also how do you practice them not as boxes?
#7
Quote by Shecter78787
So, i know the box shapes major/minor and pentatonic. Ive been mainly using those to solo and ya its quite limited. I recently learned how using arpeggios form the chords can make really melodic phrases for nice soloing. But now im trying to break out of the boxes. I can go quickly form box to box but i still see the scale as The box im in, the one to the left and the one to the right. Like i can't be playing 15th fret G pentatonic box and randomly slide down to the lower notes on the neck and play in the scale still, i gota connect the boxes and work my way down which becomes very repetitive because my playing always just box to box. So im trying to see the scale as a whole scale and not just boxes any advice for this



its not a matter of practicing them "not as boxes".... its a matter of understanding what they really are, and understanding that the "boxes" are just shapes that they happen to make on the neck.

Everything you learn reinforces the next..... including the scale patterns on the neck.
Learn something new shouldn't mean throwing something away that you've already learned.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2008,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
its not a matter of practicing them "not as boxes".... its a matter of understanding what they really are, and understanding that the "boxes" are just shapes that they happen to make on the neck.

Everything you learn reinforces the next..... including the scale patterns on the neck.
Learn something new shouldn't mean throwing away something you've already learned.

+1

The shapes are incidental in the greater scheme of things, they're just the physical manifestation of the notes of the scale. You need to put the shapes to one side for the time being and spend some time learning what the scale itself is, namely the notes and intervals it contains, and more importantly how it sounds.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
How do you practice stuff like theory learning the scale learning new chords intervals and stuff like that. ive been doing so many exercise to bring my technique up to speed i don't know how to practice stuff besides speed exercises
#10
You don't do exercises...you study the scale, listen to the scale and make things with it. Playing the scale ism't particularly important, you need to understand it and know how it works so you can use it effectively.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by Shecter78787
How do you practice stuff like theory learning the scale learning new chords intervals and stuff like that. ive been doing so many exercise to bring my technique up to speed i don't know how to practice stuff besides speed exercises


I generally practice the scales for knowledge rather than speed. I don't spend too much time working on speed, instead I work on music (which may or may not be fast). For me the excessive exercise route led to non musical playing which was dictated by the fingers rather than the ear.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2008,
#12
Quote by Shecter78787
How do you practice stuff like theory learning the scale learning new chords intervals and stuff like that. ive been doing so many exercise to bring my technique up to speed i don't know how to practice stuff besides speed exercises


Get yourself a book of scale studies. The general idea is you organize the scale in
some form a musical and/or theoretical way and then practice that scale concept in
a variety of ways. This works on several fronts. It ingrains the concept in your
mind. It tunes your ears to how it sounds in many permutations. It trains your
fingers how to form that concept on the fingerboard.

If you just focus on your fingers and speed exercises that's all you have. Finger
movements without any meaningful content to them. Then, that's what your
playing will sound like which nobody really wants to hear.
#13
Quote by Shecter78787
How do you practice stuff like theory learning the scale learning new chords intervals and stuff like that. ive been doing so many exercise to bring my technique up to speed i don't know how to practice stuff besides speed exercises


Learn the scale, learn the notes, use the CAGED method if you want.

- Then, for breaking the boxes, spend some time on each pattern jamming on it.
- Then jam linearly, on each string, up and down the neck. (by this time you should see how the scale actually sounds and the intervals on it)
- Next step: start mixing patterns. Jam on pattern 1 and 2 for example, 1 and 3, whatever, keep your patterns close because it will be easier...
- Finally, try mixing the patterns with the linear jam you just did before. Take it easy, you want to sound musical, so slow it down and explore. Some cool ideas will come to you. Be aware of the notes you're playing also.

This is how I apply a scale to a musical situation, try it, might work for you.
#14
Quote by Shecter78787
How do i memorize all the notes on the fretboard this task seems too much.


It's easier than it might seem. The notes on the 4th string are the same as the 6th string except two frets up (for example, 6th str, 5th fret is A, 4th string, 7th fret is A but one octave higher). The notes on the 3rd string are the same as the 5th string except 2 frets higher. The notes on the 2nd string are the same as the 4th string except 3 frets higher. And the notes on the 1st string are the same as the 3rd except 3 frets higher.

So, given all these relationships, it's really only like learning 3 strings.

And this is totally, mega, worth your time, trust me.
#15
^ seriously, thats exactly how it formed in my mind at the beginning. TS, once you can look at it like this then i recommend you to start learning actual note names. its great to be able to say" i have a D major coming up so theres the D, F# and A and i can play with and around these and its guaranteed to sound good"