#1
What's the deal with these? They add color, but how can one apply them in chord progressions and when improvising? What's the theory behind them (other than sounding nice?)
#2
what i like to do is say im soloing in C, and im mostly using c major pentatonic, besides using the blue notes, use the notes that overlap the patterns as if you were playing in c minor pentatonic.
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#3
A few general rules are:

a) notes that are adjacent in key(in regards to the circle of fifths) are most often used as chromatic or passing notes, this is not a rule but the general trend. e.g. playing an F# while in A minor as opposed to a D#

b) A chord progression will often use a leading tone which is out of key, that is something like a progression of Am-G-F-E. The G# in the E chord is not in the key of A minor, but it's purpose is to create a strong half-tone resolution to the A when you go back to the Am chord. This strengthens the connection the chords have to one another

from here, it gets a lot more complicated.
Last edited by farcry at Aug 28, 2008,
#4
Passing tones can be chromatic and/or diatonic.

One way you can use chromatics is in triadic generalization and is pretty easy.
You take the key of the song and/or section and just use the 1, 3 and 5 of the I(7)
as your soloing notes. Those are your "chord tones" (CT). For each CT you can
have an upper neightbor tone (UNT) or lower neighbor tone (LNT). You can
make lines out of the same patterns of UNT, LNT and CTs for each of the 1,3 or
5 CTs. Generally, your CTs will fall on important/strong beats.

The basic rule is the LNT is a chromatic 1/2 step down from the CT,
the UNT is a diatonic step above (either whole or 1/2 step).

Some common patterns:

LNT-UNT-CT or UNT-LNT-CT
UNT-CT-LNT-CT or LNT-CT-UNT-CT
CT-UNT-LNT-CT or CT-LNT-UNT-CT

This is AKA "encirclement".
Last edited by edg at Aug 29, 2008,
#6
Quote by matthewt
What's the deal with these? They add color, but how can one apply them in chord progressions and when improvising? What's the theory behind them (other than sounding nice?)



There's no such thing as theory other then sounding nice, that's the point of theory.
#7
Quote by The_Sophist
There's no such thing as theory other then sounding nice, that's the point of theory.


uhh dissonance?
#8
Dissonance is used to make the next non dissonant thing sound better, usually. Some people also enjoy dissonance.
#9
Quote by The_Sophist
There's no such thing as theory other then sounding nice, that's the point of theory.


So all those hours spent on learning theory were for nothing.

You should tell me at the beginning that I should only sound nice...

/sarcasm
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#10
I think saying the entire history of music theory and all of its pursuits were for the purpose of "sounding nice" is a gross over simplification. Some musicians purposefully play out of key and chromatically to create sounds that aren't pleasant. Take buckethead for example, many of his songs end in random out of key dissonant passages. Yet he uses his knowledge of music to make it sound like that, it doesn't sound pleasing, it sounds like a madhouse which is what he's going for.
#11
Quote by The_Sophist
There's no such thing as theory other then sounding nice, that's the point of theory.


In Renassaince or Gothic music some very dissonant intervals were used like diminished 6th or augmented 6ths, or diminished 7ths, augmented seconds, even the irregular octave, etc.....
Well, I think it was Renassaince music, or at least some weird people in the 1400...


"Music" as you know nowadays came to be because of music, this mostly includes tunings, which kind of changes all the perception of what sounds "nice" and what doesn't.
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 29, 2008,
#12
Quote by The_Sophist
There's no such thing as theory other then sounding nice, that's the point of theory.


Yes, actually there is such a thing as the field of study called music theory. The point is not to make music sound nice, but rather to study it (regardless of its "niceness").


Its up to the artist to decide what their music should sound like.

Quote by matthewt
What's the deal with these? They add color, but how can one apply them in chord progressions and when improvising? What's the theory behind them (other than sounding nice?)


To answer this question, why not study some music that utilizes them and find out for yourself ?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2008,
#13
Quote by farcry
I think saying the entire history of music theory and all of its pursuits were for the purpose of "sounding nice" is a gross over simplification. Some musicians purposefully play out of key and chromatically to create sounds that aren't pleasant. Take buckethead for example, many of his songs end in random out of key dissonant passages. Yet he uses his knowledge of music to make it sound like that, it doesn't sound pleasing, it sounds like a madhouse which is what he's going for.



I'm sorry, I only meant that the point of music theory is to make good sounding music, pleasing music, I guess "nice" was the wrong choice of words.