#1
I have been working a lot on scales and solos since I got my electric few months ago, but I have noticed my ability to hold a steady chord progression has fallen off a bit. I'm wondering what are good exercises for practicing rhythm to develop proper timing and such? Is it just random chords with a metronome or certain patterns or something else more methodical?

Any specific tips are greatly appreciated, thanks!
#2
jut practice keeping up with rythme sections in chord driven songs (no dual lead stuff haha) like try elderly woman behind a counter something or other by pearl jam its all chords
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#3
Playing all the chords you can possibly learn -- 7ths, diminished, augmented, ect. and just play with a metronome. Practice triplits, 3/4 timing (and any kind of timing), quater notes, whole rests, drop-outs, anything that has to do with timing is great.
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#4
You gotta remember that your metronome is your friend. Find a song you like and learn the chord progression. Set your metronome and start strummin' away until you can get decently fast at it. For me, I play alot of metal rhythm so I mix in alot of palm mutes and alternate picking when I practice, which can be alot of fun.

Also remember that you learn/re-learn stuff fastest when it's stuff that you actually like. Practicing rhythm can be pretty tedious so make sure you are playing songs you can listen to more than once when you are playing.

Happy strummin'!
#5
Thank a ton fellas Few questions then:

1. I really like Floyd, Zep, etc. classic rock bands-- can ya recommend a few joints that are mainly chord progressions??

2. What's a good link with chords listed in a printer-friendly style? I found some good sites but lots of flash and more interactive stuff than printable lists.

Thanks again!
#6
I find that there are other more interesting things that have a sort of metronome effect.

1. A drum machine or anything else that makes a drum beat. The more you put in, the more you'll get out of it. At worst you can just use a bunch of hi-hat hits to work just like a metronome.
2. Another musician that can play in time especially a drummer.
3. The actual recording of the song you're trying to play.
#7
Quote by Adrian Smith
I find that there are other more interesting things that have a sort of metronome effect.

1. A drum machine or anything else that makes a drum beat. The more you put in, the more you'll get out of it. At worst you can just use a bunch of hi-hat hits to work just like a metronome.
2. Another musician that can play in time especially a drummer.
3. The actual recording of the song you're trying to play.


Also, being a rhythm guitar, you defiantly should consider tapping your foot. It works great for keeping time.
#8
Yeah, I'm all for foot tapping... except on stage. I haven't been on a stage in so long, though.
#9
Yeah I have started to tap my foot in the last week or so, focused on making a habit out of it, it has been helping for sure.

I'm practicing Wonderwall, Only Heart (Mayer) and Daughters (Mayer) currently. These are pretty hard, especially Mayer's stuff, maybe I am going too advanced! I'm not sure (I really enjoy these particular songs). What are some easier plain acoustic songs I can strum and sing for practice?

Thanks a lot this forum really rocks!
#10
Quote by michaelscofield
Yeah I have started to tap my foot in the last week or so, focused on making a habit out of it, it has been helping for sure.

I'm practicing Wonderwall, Only Heart (Mayer) and Daughters (Mayer) currently. These are pretty hard, especially Mayer's stuff, maybe I am going too advanced! I'm not sure (I really enjoy these particular songs). What are some easier plain acoustic songs I can strum and sing for practice?

Thanks a lot this forum really rocks!



Wonderwall shouldn't be too hard; one of the first songs I learned myself. It amy look ti though, but once you get it, you'll be doing it in your sleep.
#11
Thanks a lot, I have been using the metronome website for the last week or so and it's helping quite a bit

So the best bet is to keep working on songs I like that are mainly chord progressions?
#12
Yes, but try practising some different rhythms while playing, some more syncopated ones to test yourself :cheers
...
#13
Quote by michaelscofield
Thank a ton fellas Few questions then:

1. I really like Floyd, Zep, etc. classic rock bands-- can ya recommend a few joints that are mainly chord progressions??

2. What's a good link with chords listed in a printer-friendly style? I found some good sites but lots of flash and more interactive stuff than printable lists.

Thanks again!


1.
As far as Floyd goes, Mother is just G, C, D, and F in different orders. The solo is simple as well, nice and melodic.

Wish You Where Here and Comfortably Numb are also nice easy progressions.

2.
Here: http://www.macca-central.com/macca-songs/images/guitar_chords_more_500.jpg

Damn...I might print that one out myself!
#14
Thanks a bunch fellas. Wow Fratman that is awesome! I just printed it out, really handy pic, thanks so much! Time to get practicing

Another thing, what are general steps for developing the ability to sing and play at same time? I don't expect to sing and play Little Wing any time soon lol but some of the simpler songs.. I should work on the chord progression itself and get that down of course, but is it proper to play real slow and sing for practice? Just seems difficult to sing real slow if that's the case.

Thanks