#1
I've been on eBay looking for acoustic guitars but some guitars say classical. Since this section of the forum is titled Acoustic & Classical Guitar, I thought I'd post this question: What's the difference?
#2
size and strings
The classical has nylon and silver wound strings
and acoustics are bigger, bassier and does come equiped with copper and nickel strings.
these are the major differences but note the string material isn't always the case.
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#3
yes, classical guitars have nylon strings. Nylon strings provide a more mellow soft tone than a steel string acoustics trebly twang i guess you could say. also the neck meets the body at the 12th fret versus most steel string acoustics meeting at the 15th fret.
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#5
Quote by killboypowerhed
dont go classical unless you play classical

being a shredder, I prefer classical by a long shot not because of string tension or playability, just the sound the instrument produces.
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#6
Quote by 68_SG
size and strings
The classical has nylon and silver wound strings
and acoustics are bigger, bassier and does come equiped with copper and nickel strings.
these are the major differences but note the string material isn't always the case.


There are several steel string acoustics that are smaller or similar size to a classical. Not all steel stringe guitars are jumbos or dreadnoughts. There are parlors(0), 00, 000, OM. Just giving a heads up.

If you want to play classical music get a classical and if you are going to major in guitar in college then you want a classical. If you want to play what most rock, country, slap, etc. styles play then find a guitar that you are comfortable playing, although if you play in the correct position then you should not have a problem with that. Don't get a dreadnought because everyone has one. If you like the sound and you are comfortable with the neck get it.

Good luck
#7
Listen to some classical on you-tube and then decide if it is the style for you. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT4az_Fzfqo [from another thread].

If you want to play popular music, you might prefer a steel string although it can be played on a classical too. Initially classicals are easier to play, but to play well they are no easier than steel string guitars. To the standard of the vidio clip they are very difficult indeed.
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 29, 2008,
#9
Initially classicals are easier to play, but to play well they are no easier than steel string guitars. To the standard of the vidio clip they are very difficult indeed.

Classicals have larger necks, larger space between strings and higher action. They are much harder to play than a steel-string guitar. The nylon is softer on the fingers, but they are still harder to play.
#10
Quote by BlackArmor
Classicals have larger necks, larger space between strings and higher action. They are much harder to play than a steel-string guitar. The nylon is softer on the fingers, but they are still harder to play.


I don't know if I agree, I found that the wider fingerboard allows me to hold onto chord shapes more easily, and the space between each string just reduces the risk of fumbling.
However, to each his own . TS, I'd recommend first looking for the sound you want, and then maybe trying a few different types of acoustic and classical guitars.
#11
No one has mentioned construction, yet. First of all, the different desired tone makes for naturally different bracing patterns. Then, you have the lack of a truss rod (which means relief is pretty much dictated by the tension of your strings). And the list really goes on. Tuners are different, bridge shape is different, etc.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#12
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#13
Some classicals do have truss rods though, not many, but some do.
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#14
Quote by KSUGuy
Some classicals do have truss rods though, not many, but some do.

If you're talking about the square-tube neck reinforcements, I'd hardly call them truss rods. They don't actually pull against the strings, they just keep the neck from getting thrown too much in either direction. You can still see the strings pull on the neck, even with those things.

If you're talking about the standard bolt-action truss rod, then that's a valid argument. I haven't seen one, but I'm sure they exist. I suppose you could say the same thing about some steel strings (anyone remember the ebony-strip Martins?). For the most part, though, you're looking at somewhat different construction to deal with a large difference in tension. I mean, you wouldn't put a Hot Rod 2-way truss on a classical.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#15
Actually some classicals come with a strand of ebony encrusted in the back of the neck. Others come with nothing. Others come with the tube and some(very high range ones) come with an adjustable truss rod, which is adjusted from inside the sound hole.
#16
Quote by confusius
Actually some classicals come with a strand of ebony encrusted in the back of the neck. Others come with nothing. Others come with the tube and some(very high range ones) come with an adjustable truss rod, which is adjusted from inside the sound hole.

Thanks, confusius. I can always rely on you for info about classical.
Sincerely, Chad.
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