#1
okay so I'm currently pretty terrible at rhythm and really need to improve
I was wondering what eveeryone thought was the quickest and most efficient way?
what should I do to get rid of this problem?
thanks for your help
#3
i've never had bad rhythm but i would say practice with a metronome, and when listening to a song, try and keep with the beat?..
#4
Focus on making as few movements with the fingers as possible when changing chords. For instance, when playing open chords and going G-C-D, the ring and middle fingers should remain static relative to each other, and just change strings. Once you get used to it, your main concentration should be on placing the pinky for the G, and the index for the C and D. You'll find a lot of the more common chords utilize similar hand positions.
#6
Quote by Boorat
okay so I'm currently pretty terrible at rhythm and really need to improve
I was wondering what eveeryone thought was the quickest and most efficient way?
what should I do to get rid of this problem?
thanks for your help


Do you mean "rhythm guitar" as opposed to "lead guitar".... or do you mean your timing is bad?

For timing....... play to a metronome

for rhythm guitar....... learn and play some songs

of-course you could do both.
shred is gaudy music
#7
I say set a metronome to a certain tempo eg. 120 bmp, then strum a chord or a note or whatever on every beat. When you can do that perfectly, do two to a beat making sure they are even and when you can play that fine do four every beat etc. Keep moving doing that and increasing the tempo, works every time. Also just playing along to some of your favourite songs is a great way to build a sense of rhythm.
Ibanez S7320
Marshall Valvestate 100v Model 8100 Head
Marshall 1936 Lead Cab
\m/ Latria \m/
#8
What genre?
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#9
yeah, I meant like my timing is bad, it seems to mostly act up when I'm playing things and then I miss a note and I speed up to catch up to where I should be.

I'm playing rock I guess, indie even though it isn't a genre, things like bloc party some rhcp islands, unicorns, the cribs, guns n roses, rush

im currently doing what new_age_reject suggested! will get back on how that turns out

are there any songs that are really good for this sort of thing?
#10
Metronome

Play along with a solid drum beat/'s

Play along with songs

and when you do this record yourself so you can hear what you are doing.
#11
Quote by Boorat
yeah, I meant like my timing is bad, it seems to mostly act up when I'm playing things and then I miss a note and I speed up to catch up to where I should be.

I'm playing rock I guess, indie even though it isn't a genre, things like bloc party some rhcp islands, unicorns, the cribs, guns n roses, rush

im currently doing what new_age_reject suggested! will get back on how that turns out

are there any songs that are really good for this sort of thing?


If you miss a note, especially in a live situation, then just carry on with what your playing and pretend you didn't even miss it. But when practising at home, if you miss the some note each time then hammer home on your mistakes, keep going over it until you get it right.
Also as 'memyselfandus' said, record yourself, that way you can hear if you go wrong at certain places that you miss when your playing.
Ibanez S7320
Marshall Valvestate 100v Model 8100 Head
Marshall 1936 Lead Cab
\m/ Latria \m/
#12
As said, if you don't practice regularly with a metronome or at least a drum machine
your timing will likely remain bad.

Here's how I approach working with a metronome that helps me to develop my
timing, accuracy and speed when I'm working on scale-related practice:

First of all, I set my metronome to maybe 60 BPM and LEAVE IT THERE. If everyone
would stop using your metronomes like a stopwatch, always setting it higher
and higher in order to play the same thing faster and faster, you'll actually
improve your timing and accuracy AND get faster.

I might start off playing something in 8th notes at 60 BPM which is VERY slow.
The point is to feel and hit the beat EXACTLY. This isn't necessarily as easy as it
sounds at this tempo -- most people will play ahead of the beat. You want to
discipline yourslef to FIND and FEEL the beat.

Then, I'll play the same thing, but in 8th note triplets, then 16th notes, then 5 notes
per beat, 6 notes per beat, etc... Not only am I working on pulse accuracy, but
I'm also getting the feel for how the same notes sound with different timings -- very
important for phrasing.

At some point, I hope everyone will figure out, that how many BPM's you set your
metronome to, doesn't say anything about how fast you can play.