#1
I am taking lessons and we are learning to denotate the fretboard. Right now i am going through the c major scale and playing and saying the triads at the same time to help denotate the guitar.So like C-E-G, D-F-A etc. Now me and my guitar teacher talked about how in the c major scale playing C-E-G you only play 2 strings so it isnt a chord so he told me to also learn to play it like this. so here is the first way where you only play 2 strings.

Example 1
-------------------
------------------
-------------------
--------------------
-----------7----10-----
--------8------------ and this is what he also wanted me to practice so it is 3 strings being played instead of 2

Example 2
------------------------
-----------------------
------------------------
---------------------5---
---------------7---------
---------8---------------


MY guitar teacher also talked about intervals but i forgot what the intervals are called so here is my question. in example 2 what is it called to play from C(8 fret low e string)to E(7 fret a string) and what is it called to play from E(7 fret a string) to G(5 fret d string).And any other intervals that i would need to know when dealing with learning triads in the c major scale .i hope i made sense and thanks to anyone who can understand what i am talking about and can help
Guitars:
Gibson SG
Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
SQUIER
Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#2
This is the easiest way to do it and I think its called generic intervals. Basically if you start on the note C like you said and you want to find what the interval is called up to E you just basically say the alphabet lol. Say C and count 1 on your finger, then say D and now put a 2nd finger up, then say E (ok now ur at E) and put up another finger..look at ur hand now u got 3 fingers up..so its a 3rd! now if u wanna know if its major or minor or augmented or whatever then you would have to know how many half steps and whole steps make up each interval. its very simple and there are charts you can look at to help you. like if you start on C and end at E you'll see that you moved up 2 whole steps which makes up a major 3rd. make sense ??
#3
so C to E is a major 3rd. i get that,what would it be called to go form E to G and C to G,thanks
Guitars:
Gibson SG
Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
SQUIER
Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#6
ok i understand how going from C to E is a major 3 and going form E to G is a minor third but im still confused about how going from C to G is a perfect 5.So 2 whole steps is major.1 1/2 whole steps is minor and is 3 1/2 whole steps a perfect 5.am i right?
Guitars:
Gibson SG
Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
SQUIER
Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#7
yeah i know what is confusin u. do you know how to play a C major scale on the guitar starting on the low E 8th fret? because its kind of pointless if you dont and your teacher is throwing this crap at u
#8
Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Augmented 2nd/Minor 3rd
Minor 3rd/Augmented 2nd
Major 3rd/Diminished 4th
Augmented 3rd/Perfect 4th
Perfect 4th/Augmented 3rd
Augmented 4th/Diminished 5th
Minor 5th/Augmented 4th
Perfect 5th
Augmented 5th/Minor 6th
Major 6th
Augmented 6th/Minor 7th
Major 7th
Perfect Octave (8th)/Augmented 7th

I believe those are correct. But this should make do:

Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Minor 3rd
Major 3rd
Perfect 4th
Diminished 5th/Augmented 4th
Perfect 5th
Minor 6th
Major 6th
Minor Seventh
Major Seventh
Perfect Octave
#9
i know the major scale starting on 8 fret low e string.at the end of my last lesson my teacher was telling me what the intervals are called but we didnt have much time so we hurried and i forgot pretty much what he told me but i do know the major scale.
Guitars:
Gibson SG
Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
SQUIER
Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#11
ok well u know the the C major scale is C D E F G A B.. so right when you start playing that scale on the eight fret start counting from one until you get up to G. u should have counted up to 5 by the time u get to G so there u go its a 5th. or perfect 5th whatever u wanna call it. and 5th type intervals starting on the low e string will always look like that and 5th type intervals will always have the same melody
#12
A piano would help here...
First, just count from the first not till the last one, like E-F-G-A-B-C, there are 6 places, so it is a 6th...
Or count C-D-E there are 3 places so they are a 3rd apart (you only count from the degrees though, if you have C-D-Eb-E they aren't a 4th apart, since Eb is the same degree as E).
Then try to remember how many semitones (spacing between notes on a piano so you can remember) there are in that interval, you can count 4, then learn what kind of interval it is with this information..

Obviously this is over simplified but it would help to get you started...
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Augmented 2nd/Minor 3rd
Minor 3rd/Augmented 2nd
Major 3rd/Diminished 4th
Augmented 3rd/Perfect 4th
Perfect 4th/Augmented 3rd
Augmented 4th/Diminished 5th
Minor 5th/Augmented 4th
Perfect 5th
Augmented 5th/Minor 6th
Major 6th
Augmented 6th/Minor 7th
Major 7th
Perfect Octave (8th)/Augmented 7th

I believe those are correct. But this should make do:

Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Minor 3rd
Major 3rd
Perfect 4th
Diminished 5th/Augmented 4th
Perfect 5th
Minor 6th
Major 6th
Minor Seventh
Major Seventh
Perfect Octave


Let me correct it:

Unison/Diminished 2nd
Minor 2nd/Augmented Unison
Major 2nd/Diminished 3rd
Augmented 2nd/Minor 3rd/Double diminished 4th
Major 3rd/Diminished 4th
Augmented 3rd/Perfect 4th/Double diminished 5th
Augmented 4th/Diminished 5th
Perfect 5th/Diminished 6th
Augmented 5th/Minor 6th
Major 6th/Diminished 7th
Augmented 6th/Minor 7th
Major 7th/Diminished Octave
Perfect Octave (8th)/Augmented 7th
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 29, 2008,
#13
ok i understand it,thanks everyone
Guitars:
Gibson SG
Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
SQUIER
Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#14
dont let all that **** bother u cause a lot of famous guitarists dont even know taht **** cuz they use there ears and yea basically they just kick ass and plays what sounds good
#15
The root, 4th, and 5th are perfect intervals.

Therefore, C to G =

1 2 3 4 5
C D E F G

Perfect Fifth.
However, if it were something like, C to Fb, then it would be a diminished fourth.

Just to clear up WHY.
Quote by Wikipedia
For example, B–D♯ is a major third; but if the same pitches are spelled B and E♭, the interval is instead a diminished four.
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Last edited by sTx at Aug 30, 2008,