#1
lets say you wanna add groove into the song instead of just playing the root notes. if the song for example is in the key of C major, what scale to use?
#3
I'll PM you the scales!
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#4
Well you answered your own question. If its C Major, you play C major. Unless you want to be a total kook and play A minor. But play C major. If you aren't that comfortable breaking outside the root. Stick with pentatonics for a little while. They'll sound good, and teach you about advancing your basslines outside of the root.
#5
Quote by IndianRockStar
Well you answered your own question. If its C Major, you play C major. Unless you want to be a total kook and play A minor. But play C major. If you aren't that comfortable breaking outside the root. Stick with pentatonics for a little while. They'll sound good, and teach you about advancing your basslines outside of the root.


so i can use pentatonic , what others can i use? does it work for guitar solo as well? im quite new to this.. cuz i tried using notes from c major scale for a guitar solo for a song in c major key ( C D E F G A B) and some notes just couldn't fit. i dont know why it sounds weird
#6
Quote by Deliriumbassist
The C major scale.


does this mean all notes from that scale ( C D E F G A B ) would sound normal no matter which part of the song i play it? (lets say timing is correct)
#7
Not necessarily, because it is still possible to be dissonant within the same scale. e.g. playing an E and an F at the same time is highly disonant.
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#8
Quote by kaystreet
does this mean all notes from that scale ( C D E F G A B ) would sound normal no matter which part of the song i play it? (lets say timing is correct)


yup, but bear in mind that soe notes go together better than others.

x

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#9
Quote by kaystreet
lets say you wanna add groove into the song instead of just playing the root notes. if the song for example is in the key of C major, what scale to use?

I've always used the chord sructures to make up my Basslines, when I started playing many years ago very few of us actualy knew anything about scales.

I feel that moving with the chord structure produces a more effective Bassline.
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#10
Quote by kaystreet
does this mean all notes from that scale ( C D E F G A B ) would sound normal no matter which part of the song i play it? (lets say timing is correct)



Yes, but it takes time to get a sense of when you want to return to the tonic, when you want to hit a dominant/octave, etc. All notes fit, but you want to return to the tonic, for example, at the end of a musical phrase to resolve it usually. That's the most obvious example, but you'll slowly get a feel for when every part of the scale is most useful.

Don't worry so much about us telling you, you've listened to music for years, it's all already completely internalized for you: you know what sounds good and what doesn't, just keep playing around within those scales until you get a feel for what works best at different times. your best bet is to listen to songs in certian keys and jam along for a few hours a day. A couple months of this and you'll have no problem instinctually finding the best note to play.
#11
i can't believe noone mentiond throwing in chromatics. here start with a c blues scale pattern.

C,E,F,F#,G,B,C

sure it doesn't sound very bluesy but it could be fun to play with.
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#12
try playing the notes of the chord that your playing over. ie: if it is an e major chord try playing e, b, and g#. when the guitarist switches to a new chord, maybe A minor, play the notes of that chord (in this case a, e, and c) that way whatever your playing is always within the scale and will always sound good over the chord because it is just an arpeggio of the chord.
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#13
Quote by the elshal
try playing the notes of the chord that your playing over. ie: if it is an e major chord try playing e, b, and g#. when the guitarist switches to a new chord, maybe A minor, play the notes of that chord (in this case a, e, and c) that way whatever your playing is always within the scale and will always sound good over the chord because it is just an arpeggio of the chord.


does it work? i heard u have to play according to the key of the whole song, not changing keys.
#14
Quote by kaystreet
does it work? i heard u have to play according to the key of the whole song, not changing keys.


The trouble is, a lot of modern music uses notes outside the key fairly regularly. I am another person that prefers to set the scale I am playing in to each chord change.
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#15
Quote by John Swift
I've always used the chord sructures to make up my Basslines, when I started playing many years ago very few of us actualy knew anything about scales.

I feel that moving with the chord structure produces a more effective Bassline.


I do a combination of both--using the key and the chord structures to develop basslines, esp. in playing jazz.
#16
THIS is the stuff I am getting into....not learning to play songs I like, but rather learning WHY a song I like SOUNDS good.

I wish I had learned more music theory when I started learning 6-string guitar...with the bass, I have an entire book. BTW, this might sound funny, but "Bass for Dummies" is amazing. It has a HUGE section on grooves/scales/modes, and it's all collected in one section, so it's easy to go to.
#17
Quote by Revelation
i can't believe noone mentiond throwing in chromatics. here start with a c blues scale pattern.

C,E,F,F#,G,B,C

sure it doesn't sound very bluesy but it could be fun to play with.



I'm not surprised it doesn't sound bluesy, it's not the C blues scale. C blues would be C Eb F F#/Gb G Bb C
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#18
Pah!

Scales? Keys? Who needs them. Play whatever the hell you like. They'll follow you eventually.
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#19
Quote by sinan90
I'm not surprised it doesn't sound bluesy, it's not the C blues scale. C blues would be C Eb F F#/Gb G Bb C


I was going to say something, but I wasn't sure it was my place.

Anyway, the notes that "don't sound good" are probably 4ths, or f in C major. It's so dissonant because it's a half step from the third. The other reason is that, even if the song stays in C major, the chords may move, and probably will. C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A min and B dim are all chords that contain notes only found in C major. If you only play C major over and E minor chord, you're going to sound a little wonky, because your tonic and "key" has changed to E minor.

In short, if you want to create more intelligent bass lines, start learning some basic theory.
#22
Quote by sinan90
I'm not surprised it doesn't sound bluesy, it's not the C blues scale. C blues would be C Eb F F#/Gb G Bb C


Yes, that would be a blues version of C Minor... all i did was add the chromatic part into the major scale as he wants to play in a major key... it's a common practice among musicians. it's just a major version of a blues scale and it can add groove if used correctly.
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#23
Quote by John Swift
I've always used the chord sructures to make up my Basslines, when I started playing many years ago very few of us actualy knew anything about scales.

I feel that moving with the chord structure produces a more effective Bassline.


i agree, chord structures really help, especially if your going to be using pentatonics. knowing when a minor or major third is called for, as well as diminished 5ths can really help you just nail those changes.

personally, i learned to play modaly, and i base most of what i play on that, which is basically knowing the whole scale behind each diatonic chord. learn your modes well, and it will help you make cohesive lines running a multitude of chords, as well as helping you create a static bassline that can encompass several chords at once.

besides, you join a jazz band, you'll have to be able to read chord changes regardless.
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#24
Quote by dullsilver_mike
Yes, but it takes time to get a sense of when you want to return to the tonic, when you want to hit a dominant/octave, etc. All notes fit, but you want to return to the tonic, for example, at the end of a musical phrase to resolve it usually.


very sorry to double post, but i do love me some nice disonent endings

maybe i listen to too much MMW.............
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#25
Quote by Revelation
Yes, that would be a blues version of C Minor... all i did was add the chromatic part into the major scale as he wants to play in a major key... it's a common practice among musicians. it's just a major version of a blues scale and it can add groove if used correctly.



The blues scale is something specific, and it always follows the pattern of 1 b3 4 #4/b5 5 b7.

There's nothing wrong with the idea you suggested, but to call it by a wrong/misleading name is just bad practice.
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