#1
i just traded for a mim fender strat. it was a vey good deal cos my guitar was of much lower value.

it was strung with .09s. i intend to change it to .10s but i realised that he had only 2 trem springs at the back so i need to go get one more to cope with the extra pulling force.

okay heres the thing. everything is stock in this guitar. and it cant effing keeping in tune. even if i dont touch it, it somehow detunes itself. especially the B and e strings. it gets worst when i use the tremolo. the whole guitar detunes itself.

i'm going to look to buying a new set of machine heads as a last priority, because i'm super short of money and i have nvr changed one before.

is there any other way i can make this motherf****er of a guitar stay in tune?

if my only resort is buying a new set of machine heads, can anyone recommend me one that whill stick to its job of keeping in tune faithfully. cheapest possible solution.
#2
cheapest solution in which you play it safe is get a pro to look at it he could pin point the problem so you dont end up wasting any money if you end up being wrong otherwise i dont know
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#3
maybe those strings weren't strung tight enough... if it isn't that, get the new heads... and find that one spring for the trremelo, maybe even a fourth one too... it won't hurt to have a little extra strength...
#4
It should have another spring in it. 2 springs won't keep it in tune as easy, even if you use lower guage strings.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#5
yeah the stupid previous owner took it out and i asked him for it he said he lost it. so do u guys think its the springs thats causing the problem? i'm buying 3 springs just in case
#6
Quote by DudeLove
yeah the stupid previous owner took it out and i asked him for it he said he lost it. so do u guys think its the springs thats causing the problem? i'm buying 3 springs just in case

Most likely, they come with 3 springs as standard.

It shouldn't have 2 springs in it, 3 or more.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#7
okay so do u think its wise to get the springs, restring it up and see if it stays in tune and if it doesnt then get the tuning heads changed?
#8
Quote by DudeLove
okay so do u think its wise to get the springs, restring it up and see if it stays in tune and if it doesnt then get the tuning heads changed?

Yup, but remember, with Strat style bridges, when you restring them, you have to tune them, tune them again and so on till they stay, so don't worry if that happens, it's not the guitars fault.

The more springs you shove in it shortens the time aswell, but it only takes about 5 minutes.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#9
i posted in another forum and got this as a reply

extra spring at the rear may/ may not be the cure. the installation here would only serve to counter string tension to pull the bridge down to the body. if it's a tuning issue, the instrument's tuners/ nut need some looking into. in any case, just instal first


now i'm confused
Last edited by DudeLove at Aug 30, 2008,
#10
Quote by DudeLove
i posted in another forum and got this as a reply



now i'm confused


Well, there's no harm in trying, I know someone that's had the same problem, and it worked for him.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#11
There's several factors, when you're trying to keep a guitar in tune:
- Stringing technique
- proper setup
- As little friction as possible.

So let's attack these possible problems.
Friction - Your guitar has what are called string trees:

The circled metal thing keeps the string from popping out of the string nut. Useful, but they also create friction that prevents the string from returning to its proper pitch after a bend or something. So...apply some sort of lubrication to to the underside of the string tree, as pointed to by the arrow. Use something like Big Bends Nut Sauce, or Guitar Grease. Even pencil lead will work. Simply grind the pencil lead into dust on a paper, and use some of this dust on the point of friction. You can even use machine oil.
The same problem occurs at the string nut. Each groove has a bit of friction. So you can apply the same lubricant there, underneath the string, and that will help. You can also buy the appropriate replacement nut, but the nut should be made of graphite. There's less friction from that material.

Moving on to setup. There's a lot of material to cover with setup, far more than I feel inclined to go into...but I can point you towards some helpful links:
http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/tutorial1.htm
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=602241&page=1&pp=20

Lastly, stringing technique. Yes, it's possible to string a guitar improperly. I actually mess with my Strats trem a lot, and it stays in tune really nicely. Of course, I have it lubricated at the proper points of friction and have a graphite nut, but I don't use locking tuners or anything like that. The secret? Stringing your guitar the right way! Here's a link that will show you how I do it:
http://www.stringthis.com/howtostringu.html

There you go.