#1
I love the sound of this chord in Taxman and Purple Haze. I understand that it occurs naturally with the octatonic scale, but are all songs that use this written with that scale? Could it be possible to use a standard key and have the 7 #9 sound good? I think its a result of the major and minor third together, so would it be dissonant or what?
#2
You can use that chord as the dominant chord. Since dominant chords are unstable, you can add the alterations and still use them as a dominant chord. So in a blues context, you might use that chord as part of your turn around because all the extra tension resolves strongly to the root. In a jazz context, you might want to make a II V I more interesting so rather than using the usual dominant chord you'd use that.
#3
Thanks for the help. So the #9 is just an extra, non-diatonic tone that sounds good and has nothing to do with the key of the song?
#4
Kirk Hammett does it in his solo performances, he uses it right before some Am pentatonic buffoonery.
Last edited by farcry at Aug 31, 2008,
#7
Quote by matthewt
Thanks for the help. So the #9 is just an extra, non-diatonic tone that sounds good and has nothing to do with the key of the song?
Yep. What confusius say is wise.

Also I wouldnt use an octatonic scale over a #9 chord, I'd use a superlocrian (otherwise known as the altered dominant) scale with an added perfect fifth and I would also occasionally use a major sixth and a major seventh (but only as a passing tone) over that chord. You have alot of options over altered dominant chords.
#8
But that's not altered dominant. Altered dominant must have the b5/#5. So you're better off using the chord tones with the added alteration or mixolydian #9.

EDIT: ehh, or simply use the A minor pent like you would if it were a blues in A with this chord being the V(E).
Last edited by confusius at Aug 31, 2008,
#10
No no. I mean that for it to be an altered dominant chord it must have the b5/#5 interval. I don't care if it's in scale or not, this is just pissy nomenclature!