#1
So just yesterday I noticed my high E string is getting some wicked buzz, too much than I can live with. It almost deadens the note. I was wondering how much the intonation would need adjusting if I were to raise the bridge a little on that side. (My guitar has an LFR.)
#5
Well, having perfect intonation is something that I see as being necessary. I can't stand playing something and being distracted by the intonation.

But it's all up to you. If you fix the fret buzz and the intonation goes off by a long way, definately try and fix it.
#6
there's a sticky for floyds at the top of the page.

but keep in mind, intonation is tuning.

your tuning is going to need constant adjusting no matter what, so put the action where you want it.

(also keep in mind you want a level bridge.)
Jenneh

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#10
Quote by DashBlaster
So just yesterday I noticed my high E string is getting some wicked buzz, too much than I can live with. It almost deadens the note. I was wondering how much the intonation would need adjusting if I were to raise the bridge a little on that side. (My guitar has an LFR.)


Yes. Forgive me if you already know the following, but it's worth mentioning in case you don't. The saddles adjust something called "compensation". You see, simply by fretting a string, you are technically bending it a little. Pianos, harps, etc, obviously do not have this problem. So anyway, you tune the guitar, and you tune it to the twelfth fret. If the note is sharp at the twelfth fret (but in tune when open), you lengthen the string by adjusting the saddle accordingly. Likewise, if the note is flat at the twelfth fret (but in tune when open), you shorten the string by adjusting the saddle accordingly. You make these adjustments until all strings are in tune both open, and at the twelfth fret. The position of the saddle (when intonation is correct) is compensating for the string bending that occurs when fretting the string.

Any heightening of the action will throw out your intonation, and will require you to reset your intonation. It's an easy job, though.