#1
Well, here's the deal...I can play rhythm like a mother****er, I can keep time better than most drummers I know, but for some reasons...most solos seem to elude me. I can sweep, I have good legato, but I feel....inadequate at lead.

I cant seem to get the solo to Shadows and Dust by Arch Enemy Which is rediculously easy, so, I came here for some help.....can anyone reccomend me some Arch Enemy, In Flames, or any band that plays in C standard solos? I'm tired of being ONLY good at rhythm. Oh, and if you wouldnt mind...maybe some excercises that you find useful? I do 4 nps scales for warm ups, and I practice legato as well....but I feel like I'm missing something.

Thanks!

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#2
Try learning a different or easier solo. Just practicing scales and exercises doesn't help unless you put it in context to a song.
#4
Quote by one vision
Don't feel bad, rhythm playing is completely different from playing solo's. Different techniques are involved, etc. Just keep learning. Do lots of exercises to make your fingers more accurate. Chromatic scales, etc.


I prefer learning actual solos, rather than exercises, as a way of improving soloing. I know the threadstarter could work on both, but I feel it would be more beneficial to spend twice the time learning to nail all aspects of a solo rather than an exercise that doesn't necessarily apply to a song.

To Mr. valennic; I'm sorry that I can't help you directly with your question, since I don't really know any bands that play in C standard off the top of my head. I will say that I prefer learning solos in songs to doing exercises. If you like a solo, but can't get it up to speed, slow it down until you can play it perfectly. Don't rush and make mistakes; just concentrate on getting every note to sound the way you want it to, with proper articulation, phrasing and vibrato. If you start slowly and consistently and don't push yourself into making mistakes, the speed will come.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#6
Quote by pyschodelia
I prefer learning actual solos, rather than exercises, as a way of improving soloing. I know the threadstarter could work on both, but I feel it would be more beneficial to spend twice the time learning to nail all aspects of a solo rather than an exercise that doesn't necessarily apply to a song.

To Mr. valennic; I'm sorry that I can't help you directly with your question, since I don't really know any bands that play in C standard off the top of my head. I will say that I prefer learning solos in songs to doing exercises. If you like a solo, but can't get it up to speed, slow it down until you can play it perfectly. Don't rush and make mistakes; just concentrate on getting every note to sound the way you want it to, with proper articulation, phrasing and vibrato. If you start slowly and consistently and don't push yourself into making mistakes, the speed will come.


Well, I can play the REALLY slow solos...but it's these kinds of things that get in my way.

Thanks for the advice

Quote by bgc
Make sure you can alternate pick!




I can alternate pick quite well too, it's just stupid stuff that gets me all messed up

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#7
I know what you mean, psychodelia. Although exercises are a shortcut, in a way. Classical musicians play etudes which relate to a bigger piece which they are trying to tackle. To each his own though.

TS, it really depends on what you need to work on. Picking? Bending? Combining different techniques?
#8
off the top of my head, november rain is entirely in c major save for the outro solo iirc, which is in c harmonic minor.

but yeah, the main solo is just c major pentatonic with a couple of major scale notes and passing tones.
#9
Quote by one vision
I know what you mean, psychodelia. Although exercises are a shortcut, in a way. Classical musicians play etudes which relate to a bigger piece which they are trying to tackle. To each his own though.

TS, it really depends on what you need to work on. Picking? Bending? Combining different techniques?


It's generally the finger positioning along with the picking patterns that get me. If it's a simple 3 nps descending shape, I can do it easily, no matter how fast. But some of the solos get.....weird =S, and those are the ones I need to work on.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#11
Yeah, but here's the thing, I often dont have the patience to do that...or it's more of a, my family doesnt have the patience to hear me practice

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#12
Quote by valennic
Yeah, but here's the thing, I often dont have the patience to do that...or it's more of a, my family doesnt have the patience to hear me practice

You'll just have to practice with the amp low or off then.

Tbh I've skipped most of the posts, but my advice would be to learn the solo in sections so its eay to remember. Don't learn the whole thing in one hit.

If there's a fast bit, you have to start slow to get it under your fingers.
#13
Just slowwwwwww it down and practice the hard parts to a metronome, slowly building speed until you can play it perfectly at tempo. It could take anything from one day to a month, you just gotta keep working on it. There is no "magic exercise" that makes you good at playing lead guitar.
#14
Quote by CowboyUp
Just slowwwwwww it down and practice the hard parts to a metronome, slowly building speed until you can play it perfectly at tempo. It could take anything from one day to a month, you just gotta keep working on it. There is no "magic exercise" that makes you good at playing lead guitar.


Alrightey then, time to break out the ole metronome.... Any songs you have in mind with some good solos??? Preferably with sweeping. It's been a while, and I'm kinda rusty

Ah, I wish there was though....I think I'm going to FINALLY go look at the Ultimate Guitar Pro exercises thread, well, thank you for the help

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance