#1
I'm sure this is a question with an obvious answer (Like Gibson guitars, etc), and you'll all just give a resounding "Yes". Why the f*ck should after-market guitar pickups (Seymour Duncan, DiMarzio, etc) cost £50+? I happen to know for a fact through someone who makes guitars and pickups (Ray Cooper, genius) that guitar pickups cost something like 4p in materials to make. I know there's the cost of labour etc, and then obvious a profit margain, but since when do these things add well over 125,000% to costs? That's a f*cking ridiculous profit margin! There's nothing else in the world to my knowledge that sells for amounts of such extreme orders of magnitude over what they cost to make. It's like swapping a portable television for a penthouse on a 50 acre estate. It's that kind of trade-off lol.
#2
actually, things you do for hobbies always cost more.
look at sporting goods stores.
#3
The majority of price involved with any sort of electronics are based on purchasing a unique intellectual property. And well, that's business for you. If a company thought they could milk 300 dollars for after market pickups out of you they would do it, and few companies want to reduce prices significantly because

A. They don't want to decrease the potential in a profitable market,

B. It's a specialized market...think of how many guitar players there are. Now narrow down that narrow field even more by targeting the few guitar players willing to tamper with stock pickups or electronics, and narrow that down even further when you factor in competition.
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#4
actually, now that i've changed my pickups a few times and am fullly confident of wiring most pickups on my own, i wish that manufacturers would sell guitars specially with no pickups at all!

so we can have a choice of our own!
#5
I'm sure this is a question with an obvious answer (Like Gibson guitars, etc), and you'll all just give a resounding "Yes". Why the f*ck should after-market guitar pickups (Seymour Duncan, DiMarzio, etc) cost £50+? I happen to know for a fact through someone who makes guitars and pickups (Ray Cooper, genius) that guitar pickups cost something like 4p in materials to make. I know there's the cost of labour etc, and then obvious a profit margain, but since when do these things add well over 125,000% to costs? That's a f*cking ridiculous profit margin! There's nothing else in the world to my knowledge that sells for amounts of such extreme orders of magnitude over what they cost to make. It's like swapping a portable television for a penthouse on a 50 acre estate. It's that kind of trade-off lol.


You were mis informed, pickups cost a lot more than that to make. They even cost big companies like duncan more than that.

Also keep in mind that when you spend 50 quid on an American made pickup, it has customs fees, and shipping added to the price. You also have the music shops mark up. Typically, if a music shop is selling something for 50 quid they purchased it for about 27 quid from a distributor that probably paid about 17... A lot of the markup is because if distributing
Not taking any online orders.
#6
The materials may be relatively cheap but making pickups is extremely labour intensive, not to mention the fact that somebody has to design them in the first place - that knowledge has worth therefore you pay for it. There's also the issue of economies of scale, in the greater scheme of things pickups are a tiny niche market, they're also low volume in terms of product shifted...once you've bought a pickup for a guitar it tends to stay there. Ther price reflects that and there are many, many products that follow the same pricing model, you've never heard of them because, like pickups, they're a specialised niche market.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Sep 1, 2008,