#1
Whenever I'm using power chords, I write them in scales. As in, the root of the power chord is limited to scales. So, a major scale of C D E F G A B, in power chords, is C5 D5 E5 F5 G5 A5 B5. Do you think that writing power chords like that achieves the unity and cohesiveness that scales have?
#2
theres not a B5 power chord in a C major scale because the 5th of B would be a Gb....and theres not Gb in a C major scale
A.K.A. Titanguy
#3
no, because all of the notes don't call into the scale. a D5 chord doesn't fit into C major nor does an E5
#4
i agree with all of the above, and it's also not a good idea just to limit yourself to a scale.
play what sounds good, and if it falls into/out of a scale, then so be it
Now officially has too much gear to list

PM me if you want to know about my recording setup
#6
Two answers here are wrong. First answer: the fifth of B is F#, not Gb. G is the b6 of B, so Gb would be the bb6 of B. F# is the fifth of B. So no, you wouldn't get a B5 chord in the key of C if you were constructing your chords completely diatonically.

Second incorrect answer: D5 and E5 do not fit into the C Major scale. Wrong. Where did you get that from? D5 is D and A, and E5 is E and B. All of those notes are in the C Major scale. In a Major scale, every note has a fifth except for the leading tone which has a flat fifth.
sig goes here
#7
Quote by Travlembo
no, because all of the notes don't call into the scale. a D5 chord doesn't fit into C major nor does an E5


that was really funny...
can you please tell which power chords fit in to a C major haha???
#8
Quote by Skater901
Two answers here are wrong. First answer: the fifth of B is F#, not Gb. G is the b6 of B, so Gb would be the bb6 of B. F# is the fifth of B. So no, you wouldn't get a B5 chord in the key of C if you were constructing your chords completely diatonically.

Second incorrect answer: D5 and E5 do not fit into the C Major scale. Wrong. Where did you get that from? D5 is D and A, and E5 is E and B. All of those notes are in the C Major scale. In a Major scale, every note has a fifth except for the leading tone which has a flat fifth.

listen to him!!!
#10
Skater... whenever I see you post, I feel like a total theory n00b.

Yes, all notes of any given Major Scale can be made a powerchord diatonically.

Apart from the leading note, the interval between that and its fifth is a of Diminished quality.
#11
Quote by Galvanise69
Skater... whenever I see you post, I feel like a total theory n00b.

Yes, all notes of any given Major Scale can be made a powerchord diatonically.

Apart from the leading note, the interval between that and its fifth is a of Diminished quality.

Well, I try. And yes, everything you've said there is correct.
sig goes here
#12
Quote by Ninjamonkey767
Whenever I'm using power chords, I write them in scales. As in, the root of the power chord is limited to scales. So, a major scale of C D E F G A B, in power chords, is C5 D5 E5 F5 G5 A5 B5. Do you think that writing power chords like that achieves the unity and cohesiveness that scales have?

Chords and scales are the same thing, just arranged differently...the chord progression for C major is

C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

so all you're doing is using the bottom 2 notes of those chords. Try not to think of it as "using power chords", think of the bigger picture...you're just using the key of C major but using chords with a neutral tonality which gives you more freedom when it comes to soloing, and they're also less likely to sound dissonant with distortion.

You should expand things a bit too, experiment with different pairs of notes from the chord progression so instead of using the root and 5th play around with the middle 2 notes, the 5th and 3rd.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com