#1
Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me out a bit.

I bought this guitar over the summer.
It's a Fender acoustic-electric.
Decent for it's cheap price and it's served me well up until now.
Lately, whenever I play a note, there's an annoying buzz down on the bridge.
I have no idea what is causing it to do this.
The only two things I can think of are as follows:
A. I haven't put new strings on in a while.
B. The bridgepins are from another guitar and might not be working.

Any suggestions?
#2
The bridge is too low or there is not enough neck relief [slight neck bow]?
#4
Sight down the neck. Is there a small bow or is it dead straight? If dead straight the truss-rod needs easing off. Take off the plastic cover [held on by 3 screws usually] and loosen it up [anti-clockwise] by about a 1/4 turn or until there is a small bow in the neck.

If after sighting down the neck and there already is a small bow, loosen off all the strings so you can slide out the bridge saddle and put a piece of cardboard under it to lift the bridge height a little. See how you go with one or the other of these solutions.
#5
^ Nope, I disagree 100%. You of all people should know that the truss rods effective range of operation ends where the neck meets the body. How is adjusting it supposed to correct a problem the TS has with buzzing at the bridge? And as for shimming up a saddle with cardboard, if that's how they do things down under, maybe it ought to stay there. Cardboard is about as worthless for shim material as toilet paper would be. To properly raise a saddle, it needs to be 1) replaced, or 2) shimmed with a similar material to minimize tonal loss at the saddle to shim to bridge contact points. Option 1 being the preferred method by far.

TS, change out your strings and as you are installing the new set, check over the bridge, saddle, bridge pins thoroughly. Look for cracked parts or parts that are overly worn giving you the buzzing. When you put the strings back into the bridge and fit the pins in, make sure they all fit snugly and hold the strings in place firmly without excess play. Reach your hand inside the soundhole and feel for loose bracing that could be causing the buzzing. Save the truss rod adjustment for when and if you really need it.
#6
Quote by LeftyDave
^ Nope, I disagree 100%. You of all people should know that the truss rods effective range of operation ends where the neck meets the body. How is adjusting it supposed to correct a problem the TS has with buzzing at the bridge? And as for shimming up a saddle with cardboard, if that's how they do things down under, maybe it ought to stay there. Cardboard is about as worthless for shim material as toilet paper would be. To properly raise a saddle, it needs to be 1) replaced, or 2) shimmed with a similar material to minimize tonal loss at the saddle to shim to bridge contact points. Option 1 being the preferred method by far.

TS, change out your strings and as you are installing the new set, check over the bridge, saddle, bridge pins thoroughly. Look for cracked parts or parts that are overly worn giving you the buzzing. When you put the strings back into the bridge and fit the pins in, make sure they all fit snugly and hold the strings in place firmly without excess play. Reach your hand inside the soundhole and feel for loose bracing that could be causing the buzzing. Save the truss rod adjustment for when and if you really need it.



Thank you very much.
#7
Lefty,

Having a swipe at Australia is not going to solve the buzz problem mentioned in this thread.

Like Utz138 said, he has 'no idea' as to what was causing the problem, so 'buzzing at the bridge' could mean anything. Too little action height or too little neck relief [or a combination of both] are common causes of 'buzz'. There are other causes, but these two are easy ones to start with and check. If neither of these issues are the problem, we can move on from there.

Sure, cardboard is not the material to [permanently] raise a saddle, but it certainly is a quick and easy material to work out if the saddle height is the problem. Also, by varying the cardboard thickness, ideal saddle height can also be determined and applied to a new saddle if one is needed.
I never recommended cardboard as a permanent fix [a new saddle is]. If saddle height is not the problem, the guy has saved money on a new one. Find the real problem first seems like sensible advice ... even from 'down under'.
Last edited by Akabilk at Sep 1, 2008,
#8
Quote by Akabilk
Lefty,

Having a swipe at Australia is not going to solve the buzz problem mentioned in this thread.

Like Utz138 said, he has 'no idea' as to what was causing the problem, so 'buzzing at the bridge' could mean anything. Too little action height or too little neck relief [or a combination of both] are common causes of 'buzz'. There are other causes, but these two are easy ones to start with and check. If neither of these issues are the problem, we can move on from there.

Sure, cardboard is not the material to [permanently] raise a saddle, but it certainly is a quick and easy material to work out if the saddle height is the problem. Also, by varying the cardboard thickness, ideal saddle height can also be determined and applied to a new saddle if one is needed.
I never recommended cardboard as a permanent fix [a new saddle is]. If saddle height is not the problem, the guy has saved money on a new one. Find the real problem first seems like sensible advice ... even from 'down under'.


Excellent idea. Reread the original post and I think you'll agree that a new set of strings first and foremost then at the same time an inspection of the bridge pins, saddle, bridge, bracing and so forth is in order. Then we can take it from there.
There's a perception thing going on in these threads, as you may or may not know. You sort of need to read between the lines and decipher what each individual is saying, should you decide to reply with advice. It's not at all easy to make accurate diagnosis on a musical instrument via text only, which is yet another reason for trying our best not to misdiagnose. Some people are better at explaining their guitars symptoms than others are.
I'm an auto tech. by trade, and have been working in that field for a good many years. I'm a guitarist by hobby, and have been maintaining and playing them for a good many years as well. Nothing better than cars and guitars, besides women, but they can be more of a headache than the other two.
Sorry about the shot at AU, but it did get your attention, which was my intent.
NEXT!