#1
I'm wondering if anyone knows the general theories behind having two melodies moving together, I read somewhere a while ago Bach or Mozart came up with a bunch of rules to it. I'm wondering about how the bass player interacts with the guitar, when I watch Hendrix jam it really sounds like they don't pay attention at all to what's going on between each other, and it sort of sounds like mud. In Floyd, a lot of the songs the Bass just follows the chord progression of the Keyboard but I'm wondering if the little extra notes the bass throws in from time to time are carefully planned so as to not clash with the guitar or if it doesn't really matter. e.g. do two ascending melody lines sound better than one ascending and one descending, is there an octave range to the movement of melodies? I'm really clueless in the area so go easy on me.
#2
It depends on what sound best in context. Things like contrary motion (f melody goes up, bass goes down and vice versa), parallel (Melody and bass move same), oblique (One stays the same note where other moves).

There's more than that, but that's basic stuff.
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#4
Quote by farcry
I'm wondering if anyone knows the general theories behind having two melodies moving together, I read somewhere a while ago Bach or Mozart came up with a bunch of rules to it.
It was actually the gregorian monks who came up with the rules and than Joseph (?) Fux wrote them into a book. Than other guys rewrote his work into something more valid for 18th and 19th century.
Quote by farcry
I'm wondering about how the bass player interacts with the guitar, when I watch Hendrix jam it really sounds like they don't pay attention at all to what's going on between each other, and it sort of sounds like mud.
Bite your tongue, boy. Those guys had some of the best musical ears known to man
Quote by farcry
In Floyd, a lot of the songs the Bass just follows the chord progression of the Keyboard but I'm wondering if the little extra notes the bass throws in from time to time are carefully planned so as to not clash with the guitar or if it doesn't really matter.
Generally the way guys that dont know counterpoint do it is by using chord tones and the notes from arpeggios and works well 90% of the time, but can sound a little plain after a while
Quote by farcry
e.g. do two ascending melody lines sound better than one ascending and one descending,
Read Moons post. The best sound is contrary motion, its the most consonant for a reason I cant really put words to. It sort of individualises the melodies?
Quote by farcry
is there an octave range to the movement of melodies? I'm really clueless in the area so go easy on me.
Sort of, you dont want to have the lowest voice lower than 3 (4?) octaves than the voice thats just above it. And if your writing music thats to be sung, you dont want to use 3 big steps that cover more than an octave, and you dont want to use more than 4 big steps. Both these rules just make that melody more singable.

Theres 100's of rules to do with counterpoint. You'll have to do the arduous task of reading 1 or 2 counterpoint treatises and spend years doing their exercises. It's taken me a whole fucken month just to finish the first 5 lessons of a 40 (maybe more?) lesson treatise.

And heres a few good treatises: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16342/16342-h/16342-h.htm (nice, simple, modern and comes with exercises) http://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&id=NcYPAAAAYAAJ&dq=counterpoint+treatise&printsec=frontcover&source=web&ots=Ngwk3Lsrmq&sig=b4jJsx20zT9fyz7wR0Hkd5lmems&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=5&ct=result (longer, harder to read, not as modern and uses weird terminology)
#5
hey thanks a lot man, I appreciate the effort you put into that.

edit: and how much do you practice that it takes that long.
Last edited by farcry at Sep 1, 2008,
#6
Quote by farcry
hey thanks a lot man, I appreciate the effort you put into that.

edit: and how much do you practice that it takes that long.
I reread the lessons once every two days and do the exercises once a week (on weekends). So, not enough.

I keep trying untill I've memorized the rules. I normally pick things up pretty quick, but counterpoint is dense and confusing. If you miss one word in some of these treatises, the whole rule doesnt make sense.