#1
E won't be the major V of A in most modes. So, will E still want to resolve to A, or will another chord take over that function (say G in A minor) ?
#3
It'll be the fifth, but it won't have the b7 and maj 3. I'm aware of plagal cadences and imperfect authentic cadences, etc. I was just wondering since the intervals of the V chord will be changed in various modes, whether the V - I function will be handled by whichever chord satisfies the same intervals that occur in the major mode.
Last edited by matthewt at Sep 1, 2008,
#5
Yes Em will still resolve to A (or Am). It won't be as strong a resolution as E to A or E to Am.
You could always just throw an E maj in anyway if you want or need to.

The resolution is due to the root movement and is strengthened by the leading tone moving to the tonic. You can use other cadences and progressions to resolve to the root but I don't know about "whichever chord statisfies the same intervals that occur in the major mode" but if the mode has a b7 making the v chord minor there is no diatonic chord that will use the leading tone.

There are other ways to create a sense of resolution. Of course there are all the other progressions and cadences. Or you could use the tension created by different inverted, extended, or altered chords in a way that leads the listener back to the comfortable stability of tonic. Get a notebook and play around with the music and make notes on your own observations.
Si
#6
Quote by ouchies
Oh in modes V - I's rarely exist. Modes are unstable and don't behave like the major or natural minor scale.

Some basic modal vamps are

Dorian : i - IV
Phrygian : i - bii
Lydian : I - II
Mixolydian: I - VII
Locrian : i - V

err yeah i hope that helped.

I find that the Mixolydian mode is the closest to being used in normal harmony. Not completely normal however, but I find that it has more chordal possibilities than other modes which are less stable.

tl;dr Mixolydian is more stable than other modes imo.

It's not really relavant. Okay.
#7
Quote by matthewt
E won't be the major V of A in most modes. So, will E still want to resolve to A, or will another chord take over that function (say G in A minor) ?

In order to strengthen the authentic cadence in a minor key, use a major 5th degree chord.

Welcome to the world of the Harmonic minor.
#8
Quote by one vision
I find that the Mixolydian mode is the closest to being used in normal harmony. Not completely normal however, but I find that it has more chordal possibilities than other modes which are less stable.

tl;dr Mixolydian is more stable than other modes imo.

It's not really relavant. Okay.
All the modes are stable and unstable in their own unique ways you just have to get to know them harmonically.

Lydian has a major tonic and major dominant but the diminished subdominant triad (#4) makes approaching the major dominant a little more difficult. You can't come up from the subdominant and you can't come down from the vii since the vii pulls naturally toward the I. Approaching the V chord from the II is a little tricky since the II is the secondary dominant of the V and it will tonicize the V chord. The V-I is still useable you just need to figure out an approach to the V.

The Lydian mode also has other opportunities. The vii - I progression for example which can sound nice since the root movement is the leading tone into the tonic and the fifth degree of the vii chord is the modal note. The modal note is also in the II chord and the Vmaj7.
Si
#9
Quote by ouchies
Dorian : i - IV and you could add a ii in there if you want
Phrygian : i - bii - bIII
Lydian : I - II
Mixolydian: I - VII or I - v
Locrian : i0
Fix'd to fit what I think sounds better.

I think its best to play the i (or I) chord for more measures than any other chord. This is why lydian would sound different to mixolydian.

Quote by 20Tigers
Yes Em will still resolve to A (or Am). It won't be as strong a resolution as E to A or E to Am.
You could always just throw an E maj in anyway if you want or need to.
To get the best resolution, you either use a vii0 - i (or I) or V7 - I (or i). Keep in mind that diminished chord resolves because it uses the same notes which make the V7 resolve so well.

Not completely relavent, but I thought I should add my input.
#10
Just throwing it out there, a common minor v progression is v6-iv6. iv can be major or minor for this. Other than that looks like I got beat to the punch.