#1
Do you have to learn theory to write riffs?

and how the heck do you compose on guitar pro 5?
I can't figure it out.
#2
tabs section

way to hard to explain with words
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#3
you need only little theory knowledge. chords, octaves, harmonies. it depends on the type of music.
#4
to write a song, you need no knowledge of theory whatsoever.

If what you're playing sounds good, no matter how much thought you put into the musicality etc etc, then it's a good song.

on the other hand, if you have unlimited knowledge of theory and you write a sucky song, you suck either way.

all that aside, I'd say knowing the keys and the chords that work in those said keys is all the "theory" I've really ever needed to write a decent song. cause basically, if you write a bunch of notes in key it'll usually sound great.

just my two cents I guess.
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...Planned on ever turned out...
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#6
Quote by mikemangone
thanks a lot bro.

got any tips for using guitar pro?


It'll get easier with time.
Poop.


Yes, poop.
#7
you'll really need to know basic rhythmic notation to get anywhere with writing stuff. the notes you can kind of hack through until it sounds like what you want (like i did when i started), but learning the different note lengths, time signatures, etc is very important.

also, in GP you can compose an entire song just using the numpad, arrow keys and -/+ (increase/decrease note length, / for triplet, * for dotted).
#8
Quote by TMA-2
you'll really need to know basic rhythmic notation to get anywhere with writing stuff. the notes you can kind of hack through until it sounds like what you want (like i did when i started), but learning the different note lengths, time signatures, etc is very important.


oh yes! totally. I always take rhythm for granted. It comes so naturally to me now that I just push it aside.

which brings me to how to use GP5. like Matt said, it comes with time. Just start tabbing and playing with stuff. If it isn't how you want it to sound, tweak it until it is. That's all the advice I can give you. I taught myself over the past couple years and now I can tab out any song in my head with hardly any "work" involved. Just keep plucking away.
...Nothing you've ever...
...Planned on ever turned out...
...The way you planned...


...You're still disappointing them...
#9
if you're playing a musical instrument, you should definitely learn the theory behind the sounds you're making. it's not completely essential, but it can only make you a better musician

you can almost certainly play a little nice chord progression without really knowing the names of what you're strumming. music theory just burns a bright light in an otherwise dark room you would be tripping around in
#10
Quote by Sinten
you can almost certainly play a little nice chord progression without really knowing the names of what you're strumming. music theory just burns a bright light in an otherwise dark room you would be tripping around in


well said, well said.
#11
If you have a good pitch, you don't really need any theory.
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