#1
I've had this problem both in using wavepad and now reaper, and I think I remember the same thing when I was messing around with audacity... when I finish a song and make it a .wav or .mp3 it's waaaaay quieter than everything else I listen to.

That is to say if I was listening to an album and then want to listen to something I've recorded, I have to seriously crank up my speakers to hear it, and then when it goes back to the album it would burst your eardrums.

There is volume stuff bottom left in reaper, but if I go past a certain level everything becomes distorted and garbled.

I'm sure I'm just overlooking a setting somewhere but can't figure out which... shouldn't be that hard to get it to just make the whole damn thing louder ><

If anyone knows how to solve this (I'm using reaper atm) advice would be greatly appreciated!
My Gear
Epi Les Paul
Roland Microcube
Boss DS-1 pedal
Shure SM57
M-Audio Fasttrack
#2
Quote by Aitrus
There is volume stuff bottom left in reaper, but if I go past a certain level everything becomes distorted and garbled.


I know my recordings sound low, and if I record loud, or make it louder later, it sounds bad.

I played around with buffer sizes to get rid of clicks and pops from louder recordings.

If you play NIB and Shred Guitar playing skill (on my profile), you can hear the difference the buffer size makes in a recording.
Last edited by xHellbound at Sep 1, 2008,
#3
Quote by Aitrus
I'm sure I'm just overlooking a setting somewhere but can't figure out which... shouldn't be that hard to get it to just make the whole damn thing louder


It actually is hard. It's a skill like everything else about recording. First your recordings have to be good and with a low noise floor and good use of your headroom. Then, once your mix is done (also a skill), you need to master things to get them up to par with commercial releases. Mastering is a real skill, especially if you want to retain any semblance of dynamics in your songs.
#4
Exactly, ebon00.

Just to add... Mastering involves compression, EQ and limiting (and/or anything else that is required) of the final mix to give it that 'pro sound polish' that we associate with great recordings. That really oversimplifies it, as it all started with mastering stuff to vinyl where the process was largely to help ensure that the needle wouldn't bounce all over the place out of the grooves, but that's a whole other story.

Yes, a whole new set of skills.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.