#3
It doesn't matter usually. As long as the right note is on bottom, just play whatever is most comfortable.
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
Rivera S-120
'60s PEPCO Model 211 5w head
'60s Paul (Pepco) 1x12 tube amp
'60s Harmony H303a 1x10 tube amp
#4
Context and key are what matter most. Inversions are there to make better voice-leading (the way in which the notes of chords move from one to the next). Say we had a passage in D major, for example. The D major chord is the ultimate point of resolution, so it would make sense to play it in root position (with D as the lowest note), since the root position chord is the most harmonically defined of the inversions. If we had a IV-V-I progression, the chords would be G major, A major, and D major. One possible way of voicing the chords is below:

e---------------------
B--12---10--10--------
G--12---9---11--------
D--12---11--12--------
A---------------------
E---------------------

Notice how smooth it sounds compared to playing it with barre chords. An easy guideline to follow is to take the shortest route from chord to chord. Rather than constantly moving around the fretboard playing root position chords, you can create a different sound by making smooth transitions between chords. I've often thought that you could play almost any progression, no matter how chromatic, if you voiced the chords in the right way. Then again, I haven't tested that hypothesis very rigorously.
known as Jeff when it really matters
#5
DO IT UPSIDE DOWN, DUHHHH. L2 INVERT PLOX.


Or, learn your fretboard.

DON'T MAKE ME DESTROY YOU!


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Quote by Scumbag1792
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