#1
Hi,
I used to be a lead guitarist in a hard rock/metal band. We had only played one live show, but we won the prize so that went well.
I was recently kicked out 'temporalily' because of a few reasons. The main of which were no.1 my timing is poor and no.2 the used to be ryhthm guitarist was getting better at guitar than me. (well thats the impression I got)
It all came quite suddenly as I knew my timing was an issue but it didn't seem to be of this much of a problem.
We agreed to re-review the situation in the new year.
Until then I'm gonna practise my arse off, which is why I've come here.
Any tips would be great
#2
It sounds like they're easing you out of the band, if I were you I'd be ready to find a new one in case that's what they were doing. I'd also try to keep in close contact with them, and also be ready to be the rhythm guitarist if they let you back in, even though I think you should do lead if your timeing's bad.
#3
Quote by stratkat
It sounds like they're easing you out of the band, if I were you I'd be ready to find a new one in case that's what they were doing. I'd also try to keep in close contact with them, and also be ready to be the rhythm guitarist if they let you back in, even though I think you should do lead if your timeing's bad.

cheers dude
I am, but funnily enough thats what I thought they were trying to do. they didnt say that thou. im ready to share roles tbh, he's not miles ahead.
#4
Well first, I think you need to be honest with yourself and reevulate the whole situation that lead to you being kicked out. Was it really just your playing ability lagging behind? Or was it some personal issue that started becoming a band issue. From my experience, kicking out someone for a period of time is just the polite way of telling them to clean up their act and getting whatever it is they do squared away.

I honestly have no way of telling and I'm not saying it's one thing or another. But, getting kicked on a whim with no explaination other than come back later is rather insulting. Just be professional about it, move on, and chalk it up as a life lesson.
#5
^ It's not all that unlikely that it's nothing personal. I've kicked a lead guitarist for bad timing. Frankly, some people just don't get the concept.
#6
thanks for the replys.
its not a personal issue, we always kept them aside from the band.
trying to get to the bottom of it at the moment,
but i'll keep the advice in mind.
#7
Quote by stratkat
It sounds like they're easing you out of the band, if I were you I'd be ready to find a new one in case that's what they were doing.

Agreed.
Many bands say that when they're kicking someone, it helps to ease the upset of sacking a band member.

What you need to do is jam with as many people as you can, go to jam nights, get to know other musicians and arrange your own jam sessions.
This serves two purposes.
1) It drasticaly improves your timing and general playing ability and gets you more used to playing with other people, which will show up as a massive improvement on your behalf if they ask you to re-join.
2) It introduces you to other people who you could possibly put another band together with.

So either way, you win.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Sep 4, 2008,
#8
It's funny. It's always the rhythm guitarist who eventually gets better than the lead, who didn't spend enough time getting his fundamental playing solid and can't stop playing sloppy solos.

Some advice: Play along to songs and record it. Timing issues really stand out on recordings and you'll know if you are improving.
#9
Quote by BrickIsRed
It's funny. It's always the rhythm guitarist who eventually gets better than the lead, who didn't spend enough time getting his fundamental playing solid and can't stop playing sloppy solos.

Some advice: Play along to songs and record it. Timing issues really stand out on recordings and you'll know if you are improving.

Thanks for the advice.
#10
The same sort of situation happened in my band. After playing a show we decided that our drummer was just not that good at drums. So we just told him we would be taking a break for awhile. We didn't tell him but during that time we were looking for a replacement. Originally we didn't really have an intention of kicking him out, but things just fell into place and we moved on without him. So in short, start looking for another band, because it seems unlikely that they would welcome you back like nothing happened.
#11
Quote by BrickIsRed
It's funny. It's always the rhythm guitarist who eventually gets better than the lead, who didn't spend enough time getting his fundamental playing solid and can't stop playing sloppy solos.

Some advice: Play along to songs and record it. Timing issues really stand out on recordings and you'll know if you are improving.


That happened with my previous band... I was the rhythm guitarist.

Only thing is, though, I still don't know much theory, so I need to start building more chops.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
What the hell is a G&L.



Quote by Flux'D
Gay & Lesbian I think, the box smelled funny
Greg what did you send me??
#12
Two things that really helped get my rhythm chops (including timing) together were:

1. Practicing EVERYTHING to a metronome
2. Jamming with others as often as possible.

The key to being able to play in a band is to be able to stay right on the beat. Get used to locking in with the drummer, not just playing your own thing on top of what the rest of the band is doing.
#13
I wouldn't even try to go back with them. If they can tell you to leave the band because you're not good enough then I doubt you want to be playing with them.
Quote by LPDave
and my mom then told me to masturbate more.

Quote by Toastbot

Big burly men grunting without shirts on pretty much summed up my childhood.

Quote by The Leader
Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do more look like?