#1
Ok, Ive gone through the theory lesson on UG, and I have learned alot. I still dont know what to do with this knowledge. Should I make a chord progression based on a key, and just play a scale over the top of it? When I play on a scale, it sounds too much like a scale, its just bland. Any tips on making my first song?

Also. Say I have a C Major Key. Can I play A minor on it because it has the same notes (Relative minor), or do I have to be in A minor key. I dont understand how scales go over key signitures. And also, say im in C major, does that mean I can play C pentatonic?
#2
pretty much yeah....carefull though with a key's ( can be reffered to here as in scale's ) particularities and ta da da.....soloing

yeah and by the way.....a minor can be played over a c major progression.....check out some theory about modes....you'll see there that in the key of c major , the a minor scale is called a aeolian ....pretty nifty stuff here...just take your time to get the hang of this stuff cause it's verry useful
Last edited by 2dor at Sep 2, 2008,
#3
The root notes play the most important part tbh.

E phrygian has the same notes as C major/A minor.

When you play a scale, don't play the same notes, do phrases, repeated patterns, etc.
EDIT: I say don't play the same notes, I mean, don't just play scales ascending/descending.
Mix through scale boxes, go up and down the neck, string skip, and so on, so forth.


Find a few jam tracks online, or write simple chord progressions, put them on a loop and keep jamming over them. You'll find stuff you like in time
#4
I suppose learning all of the scales by memory, not by shape, will probably be my first step. Does anyone know a good way of doing that?

Also, when you said that the root notes play the most important part, A minor is ok right, because it starts on A, but its the same notes.
#5
Quote by AlskiOverload
When I play on a scale, it sounds too much like a scale, its just bland. Any tips on making my first song?



Spend some time learning songs and solos. Learn what others did, then use that information & inspiration as a foundation to develop your own style.

Quote by AlskiOverload


Also. Say I have a C Major Key. Can I play A minor on it because it has the same notes (Relative minor), or do I have to be in A minor key. I dont understand how scales go over key signitures. And also, say im in C major, does that mean I can play C pentatonic?



You need a stronger foundation in the fundamentals before your going to be able to make sense of theory. I suggest using your ears to decide whether its good or not. Keep studying, and eventually your theory knowledge will catch up.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 2, 2008,
#6
I know plenty of songs and solos and stuff. But I know scale shapes, and what they do is outside of those shapes. I should probably find out how to memorize each major scale.
#7
Quote by AlskiOverload
I know plenty of songs and solos and stuff. But I know scale shapes, and what they do is outside of those shapes. I should probably find out how to memorize each major scale.


You need a stronger foundation in the fundamentals before your going to be able to make sense of theory. I suggest using your ears to decide whether its good or not. Keep studying, and eventually your theory knowledge will catch up.

Use the songs and solos that you do know as study material. Analyze them to see how they fit into theory. if you can't figure it out....... you need a more solid grasp on the basics.


Do you:

know how to read music ?

Know how to construct the Major and minor scales based on their formula ?

know how to harmonize the Major & minor scales ?

know how to construct all triads?..... 7th chords ?

have key signatures memorized ?

know what chords would be in a particular key ?

Know the notes on the neck ?

know all your Major and minor scale patterns on the neck?


That kind of knowledge should be second nature to you if you are to analyze anything.

If your not there yet, keep using your ears (and never stop), while you develop your theory knowledge.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 2, 2008,
#8
If you have a chord progression in C major, then you cannot possible play A minor over it. You will be playing C major or Ionian. To play A minor you need a tonal center of A, which C does not have.
#9
Quote by The_Sophist
If you have a chord progression in C major, then you cannot possible play A minor over it. You will be playing C major or Ionian. To play A minor you need a tonal center of A, which C does not have.


Sure you can. You can have an Am in a C major progression.... its in the key. You can play Am over C = C6. You could play the Am scale pattern (will sound as C Major)

really though, some quality time with the basics would benefit the TS alot.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Any good places for me to go?
I think Ive gotten as far as I can with the Beginning music theory lesson on UG, and Musictheory.net.
#11
Do you:

know how to read music: Yes, pretty well

Know how to construct the Major and minor scales based on their formula: Yep

know how to harmonize the Major & minor scales ? Nope

know how to construct all triads?..... 7th chords ? Yep

have key signatures memorized ? Yep, (as far as being able to look at the key signature and say which one it is.

know what chords would be in a particular key: Not great at it, but I know how.

Know the notes on the neck: Yep

know all your Major and minor scale patterns on the neck: Only a few shapes of each.