#1
This is my Squier VM P bass.


Obviously, the action is well....













What can I do, or is there anything I can do? Is the neck warped or messed up or is it just..set up badly? I get loads of fret buzz on the high frets even though the strings are high? I'm trying to sell it, but I'd really hate to doom some kid trying to learn bass with a set up like this.
#2
I can see the truss rod needs adjusting from here. I use Michael Tobias' rule of thumb. Fret the first and 15th fret at the same time. There should be a "Fender thin pick's thickness" between the string and the 8th fret. I'm betting you've about 2mm. Truss rodding will solve all your problems. I think all action could be high but all necks almost straight.

James Jamerson had a warped neck with high action - but if he got a setup, he'd be much, much cleaner.
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#3
I try to avoid messing with the truss rod but in this situation I probably should adjust it.

I hate being such a noob when it comes to these things but I have to learn sometime.

Which way should I turn the truss rod? Should I loosen the strings? How much should I turn it? and when should I expect to see the results from the adjustment?

/noobness
#5
lol omg my squier, charlie had this problem on his higher frets, until just today, i actually got so pissed i ripped off the strigns, adn slapped on some new ernie balls, charlie buzzez no more!!!
Try adding more delay.
#6
Quote by Miss G
I try to avoid messing with the truss rod but in this situation I probably should adjust it.

I hate being such a noob when it comes to these things but I have to learn sometime.

Which way should I turn the truss rod? Should I loosen the strings? How much should I turn it? and when should I expect to see the results from the adjustment?

/noobness


Do i spy a WoW player? >.>
Quote by brandooon
Buy both pickups. Rub icyhot on both of them. Sandwich your penis between them and walk to the nearest homeless shelter with your brand new icyhot penis sandwich.
#7
Quote by Woogles
Do i spy a WoW player? >.>


No, I'm just lame lol.


Thanks for the link anarkee, I can already tell a difference. I put the strings that were on my Geddy on the Squier because they still had some life left in them. Intonation is perfect, action is a bit higher than I'd like but nothing like it was before.
#9
Well new strings didn't fix the problem, I've changed the strings several times. Now its just sounds better.
#11
Holy Lord! I'll say it again and again....

Be careful with your truss rod!!!! It's the fastest way to destroy your neck. When adjusting, give it no more than a quarter turn per day. Wood necks need time to adjust and settle in to the new torque. Also, when tightening the rod, it's generally a good idea to "help" the neck by either clamping it, or by slightly pressuring it by:

-Setting the bass on the ground, standing it up.
-Put your foot in front of it, and your other leg behind it,
-And GENTLY press on the headstock with your free hand.
-While doing this GENTLY!!!, adjust your rod.

Fender-style basses generally have a primitive truss rod system, and a bad adjustment could easily compromise your neck.
"Comedy's a dead art form. Now tragedy, that's funny." -Bender Bending Rodriguez
#12
^Now, I've found very different findings than you with my Fender truss rod. I've whaled on that thing and haven't had any trouble from it ever. I've found that as long as you don't do more than a quarter to a half turn every few hours that it's fine. I don't know, maybe I've come up with a really resilient truss rod or something, but I've done it before. I've gone from heavy bow, to almost straight in 3 adjustments over a day. I'm not recommending it, but don't be scared to do it yourself, that's all I'm saying.

And by the way, that's exactly what it is, it's your truss rod. Your saddles seem to be in almost perfect position for action. As for the truss, you'll want to straighten, or tighten it.
#13
I agree that you shouldn't be afraid to work on your equipment, but in order to maintain the integrity of the neck over a lifetime of use, I'd strongly recommend my method of a 1/4 turn per day. Even with those small adjustments, you should have your neck where it needs to be in a matter of one or two days. Eastern hard maple is a very strong wood. However, if the torque of the truss rod is adjusted too quickly, any wood will begin to warp and may even develop cracks. I'd say, just be patient and gently coax your neck into having the proper relief. In a day or two, you'll be all set!

Also, when you do that 1/4 one day, the next day it will be fully settled in from the adjustment. When you first turn the rod, it'll move a little, and about 24 hours later, it'll be fully adapted to the new torque. If it still needs a little extra, go for it then, and wait another day to see where it's at.
"Comedy's a dead art form. Now tragedy, that's funny." -Bender Bending Rodriguez