#2
Have a lot of experience and good theory knowledge is a bonus.
#3
In b4 everything.

Decide if you're going to be teaching beginner or advanced students. If you're going for advanced, then you should branch off into a genre of music which you should know fluently and be able to provide examples, because it's hard to become good at every genre. Or good enough to teach at least.
#4
explaining things correctly, a bit of theory, not to much if ur teaching beginners but obviously the more advanced the more u should no

the ability to teach in score and tab,

but basically its just all about explaining urself right. u dont want to jibber on to much about **** when it could of been explain in three words, cause that would confuse them
#5
You need to know more than your student. That's most important. In most cases, you also need to play better than your student. If you're going to be teaching young kids, make sure you teach interesting things. It's best to teach them music from bands they like, especially at first.

Unfortunately, lots of guitarists are influenced by Guitar Hero, so teach them songs from that. Songs that rock, not slow songs, are especially good.

Don't bog down any student with theory. Theory comes after lots of other stuff for beginners. Teach them scales first, and only that after a couple of lessons.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
Last edited by MoonBoots432 at Sep 3, 2008,
#8
at the very least, probably how to use a metronome and practice effectively. even if you're a guitarist who can shred your students balls off, and you're getting him to practice at speeds faster than he can go accurately then he wont be progressing much and he'll be forming bad habits. theory and everything else are icing on the cake but practice is the core thing imo.
#10
Quote by mdwallin
lots of theory (dont start them on TAB)
lots of technique
lots of styles (big one)
lots of people


This guy is dumb. Start them on tab. START THEM ON TAB. One more time, START THEM ON TAB! Learning how read music is not fun or interesting. Also, you should have good technique, but you don't need to slay to teach. Just pointing out the proper way to do things. As far as lots of styles, not really. Know the basics rock, blues, jazz, and perhaps some classical pieces. Depending on your student, they probably just wanna rock, unless they're older. And you don't need to know anybody.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
#11
^ actually starting on sheet music wouldn't be a bad idea. i remember on school i started with sheet, and it was really easy to identify notes on the flute. it's not a bad idea at all.
Last edited by RCalisto at Sep 3, 2008,
#12
You need to know how to play guitar

but seriously, the most important thing to know is what your student wants to learn. If you try to teach all this clasical stuff to a kid who wants to be in a metal band. He's bound to get bored and quit.
#13
Quote by MoonBoots432
This guy is dumb. Start them on tab. START THEM ON TAB. One more time, START THEM ON TAB! Learning how read music is not fun or interesting. Also, you should have good technique, but you don't need to slay to teach. Just pointing out the proper way to do things. As far as lots of styles, not really. Know the basics rock, blues, jazz, and perhaps some classical pieces. Depending on your student, they probably just wanna rock, unless they're older. And you don't need to know anybody.

The "proper" way is to learn sheet music hands down. That said i do agree with you that some students specifically ones who are just want to play some rock songs by bands they like would be better served to learn tab first and then tackle the sheet music later on. But it all depends on the student. If someone has a music background with a different instrument like say 6 years of jazz saxophone they might think you dont know shit because you dont know sheet music. If someone played with tabs a little already and can play some riffs they might think your a tool for making them learn notation. Its all relative to the student. The best teachers adapt to the student and guide them the best they can to achieve their unique goals.

I would interview potential students and if they are to advanced for you to be a good teacher id recommend they look elsewhere and be honest. If you think you can benifet them then do it.
#14
Quote by frostfire100
You need to know how to play guitar

but seriously, the most important thing to know is what your student wants to learn. If you try to teach all this clasical stuff to a kid who wants to be in a metal band. He's bound to get bored and quit.

Unless hes the reincarnation of randy rhoads.
#15
Ideally:

- reading skills
- knowledge of musical concepts & terms, and the ability to properly explain them
- advanced theory knowledge
- the ability to learn songs by ear on the spot
- the ability to understand the needs of each student and accommodate those needs. *
- the knowledge to know what is appropriate or not for each individual student *

* Some of these things will be learned by the teacher through the experience of teaching.

At the very least:

- reading skills
- the ability to learn songs by ear on the spot
- years of experience as a player
- knowledge of musical concepts & terms, and the ability to properly explain them
- basic theory knowledge or better
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 3, 2008,
#16
You all forgot another important thing for a teacher to have. Patience. I find that the my best teachers have been the most patient to put up with my errors, or when you just don't get something.
#17
Quote by MoonBoots432
This guy is dumb. Start them on tab. START THEM ON TAB. One more time, START THEM ON TAB! Learning how read music is not fun or interesting. Also, you should have good technique, but you don't need to slay to teach. Just pointing out the proper way to do things. As far as lots of styles, not really. Know the basics rock, blues, jazz, and perhaps some classical pieces. Depending on your student, they probably just wanna rock, unless they're older. And you don't need to know anybody.

This is why there are so many inadequate teachers out there. Learning to read notation will allow you to memorize the notes of the fretboard much better than with tab. It's easier to remember notes than numbers. Obviously introduce them to tabs, but don't make it your primary teaching method.

Simply knowing pieces does nothing. The teacher would be better off improvising for his students. If someone calls himself a teacher, they should not only be able to play the genre, but explain the theory (and maybe some history) behind it as well. The guy is getting paid for his knowledge here.
#18
Quote by confusius
You all forgot another important thing for a teacher to have. Patience. I find that the my best teachers have been the most patient to put up with my errors, or when you just don't get something.


good point ! patience is very important.
shred is gaudy music
#19
i think every teacher would be patient knowing they'd get their greens at the end of the lesson lol
#25
1. What if the student is persuing a serious career in music, and planning to go on to play in an ensemble? Reading music is essential. Same with becoming a music instructor himself.
2. "Jamming" is usually not the first thing taught to beginners.
3. Knowing how to read music and document it is a convenient way to share ideas with other musicians who don't play guitar, again, the ensemble situation.
4. Why wouldn't you want to document your own songs?
5. Knowing other songs is not a bad thing to have. Maybe the student isn't interested in the TS's jazz improv (just an example, no offence, I love jazz), and wants to hear some hard rock. It's good to have a knowledge of all genres and a little repertoire to avoid losing students over such a silly thing.
#26
Quote by psychokoala
yes,
if you know theory you know how to 'jam' and make songs


I'm all for theory and everything, but a knowledge of theory alone will not enable you to jam or write well, and while theory is helpful, it is not required for either.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#27
I'm watching this thread as I plan on teaching starting sometime this fall/winter. It's something that I've wanted to do for a while, and I've been told by a couple people that I should, so hopefully it'll work out. If you guys want I'll let you know what I think from the perspective of an ex student and soon-to-be teacher. I agree with some stuff in here, but not all of it.
#28
Quote by psychodelia
I'm all for theory and everything, but a knowledge of theory alone will not enable you to jam or write well, and while theory is helpful, it is not required for either.

well of course this is assuming the person has heard music before. if you know theory and like a certain type of music you generally know what you're looking for and what you aim to sound like and knowing the theory behind it you can easily mimic it.

Quote by one vision
1. What if the student is persuing a serious career in music, and planning to go on to play in an ensemble? Reading music is essential. Same with becoming a music instructor himself.
2. "Jamming" is usually not the first thing taught to beginners.
3. Knowing how to read music and document it is a convenient way to share ideas with other musicians who don't play guitar, again, the ensemble situation.
4. Why wouldn't you want to document your own songs?
5. Knowing other songs is not a bad thing to have. Maybe the student isn't interested in the TS's jazz improv (just an example, no offence, I love jazz), and wants to hear some hard rock. It's good to have a knowledge of all genres and a little repertoire to avoid losing students over such a silly thing.

2. i said you can jam if you know theory this is after youve learned it yo
the rest we basically agree

reading music would definitely be necessary if you plan to play other's songs.

my comment was pretty much if youre teaching someone who wants to learn to make their own songs
#29
Quote by psychokoala


my comment was pretty much if youre teaching someone who wants to learn to make their own songs

True, I guess. But most beginners start out with playing their favorite band's songs. Even though composition is a dream, it's not easily attained at that stage.

But I'm not trying to pick a fight lol.
#30
Tell them to go buy Guitar Hero!
Question not yourself. Challenge those who would deny you your true self for an independent thinker is the greatest enemy to those who seek to control you
#32
Quote by TheShred201
I'm watching this thread as I plan on teaching starting sometime this fall/winter. It's something that I've wanted to do for a while, and I've been told by a couple people that I should, so hopefully it'll work out. If you guys want I'll let you know what I think from the perspective of an ex student and soon-to-be teacher. I agree with some stuff in here, but not all of it.


I'd love to hear that.
#33
Quote by psychokoala
well of course this is assuming the person has heard music before. if you know theory and like a certain type of music you generally know what you're looking for and what you aim to sound like and knowing the theory behind it you can easily mimic it.

Knowing the theory behind it will only really come from playing that sort of music and analysing it, which is best done though reading it in standard notation (helps you pick out syncopation and look at how the rythm of each part fits together).

If you don't know standard notation then how can you convey a length of time to a student in something you want them to practise? You can't show it to them and expect them to remeber how it goes perfectly (or at all).
#34
Quote by Freepower
I'd love to hear that.


Alright, here goes.....This is going to take a while

For starters, I'm not even going to go into the actual teaching part:
1. You have to know how to manage your business. Most people aren't planning on teaching for free, so it's important to think about things such as your payment policy, refund/cancellation/rescheduling policy. Etc.

2. You have to know how to get people to want to take lessons from you and look into you as a teacher. You should probably advertise yourself to an extent on the internet (Craigslist, etc., in music stores and such, hell, even on telephone poles if you want to. You should also figure out how to get your advertisement NOTICED. Designs, colors, and placement are what you need to worry about. Then, what to put on the advertisement--if you say too much stuff and your ad looks more like an essay, people are going to walk away. A couple basic things about yourself/your playing, perhaps somethings about what you'd teach, and contact info. If they like the beginning of what they see, they'd contact you for more information. It's a good idea to have videos or lessons that you've made or something on the internet that may give them just a little brief idea about you. For example, as I haven't been making many videos (I have several that I'll be making soon), I may link to my writing on sweeping for the AT FAQ. You get the idea. Business cards are good to, so if you are talking to someone and they end up being a possible student you can give it to them.

3. Simply put, you need to know how to teach. You need to know how to plan your lesson, keep control of the lesson (you ARE the teacher), and convey your information in an easy to understand manner (sorry if I fail with this post, It's late ). You need to keep your lessons interesting and MAKE them want to come back.

So, now you've got your business plans, and you've got some students. Oh noes, what to do!!!

First, for each student, you need to find out WHAT THERE GOALS ARE. (Write them down after the lesson--they can be useful to refer to later). Ultimately, you shouldn't try do inflict what YOU want them to be like on guitarists on them if THEY want to be something different. If you think they should do something different than their initial preference, ASK them if they'd be interested in doing it, perhaps play them an example, and tell them about some benefits of it. Ultimately, you have to teach the student what they want to learn, otherwise they won't keep coming back to you.

Things to teach:

Technique--Not necessarily the focus of the lesson, but technique should be taught a bit so that they have the ability to play what they want to play. With someone who is very knew, this can probably wait a bit--let them develop the basic parts of their technique over time--correct any flaws you see early, but don't go into detail until a bit later. PS. Technique includes vibrato, bending, etc.

Music Theory--First off, I'm using this as a broad term, all the way down to rhythm and notes. Theory let's people understand music and what they are playing--everyone should learn some from you. How much you teach them should depend on the student.

Reading--This I'm kind of including in music theory. Teach TAB AND Standard Notation. Both are extremely useful, and pretty important.

Improvising--You should work on this with them. In a sense, with improv there is more to learn than there is to teach--the biggest way to teach improv imo is to get them to do it, and offer constructive criticism.

Ear Training--Yet another thing to work on over time. Start simple and gradually work on to harder things. It's VERY helpful and probably one of the least focused on things as a guitarist, and it shouldn't be.

Songs--I recommend utilizing songs or parts of songs to aid in teaching things. If they are working on sweep picking for example, have them work on a good song for it that they can jam to. A bit more fun imo, and it's important to have fun. Also, you may want to work on a song or two that they are interested in learning. I recommend having them work on this mostly by themselves, with them just asking for help with certain things about it during lesson time. At some point you may want to give them songs from other genres too to help build their diversity as a player.

There's what I have for now. As you can tell, towards the end I started to feel like not writing quite so much. That's just my basic stuff. If I think of things to add or edit I will, and I may flesh out some of the things, such as ear training later.
#35
^ thanks for that, nice read.

I just started some new work today at the new place I'll be teaching. First time I've done proper teaching in like 6 months. I moved country and so lost my old part time pupils, and i've been working "real jobs" for the last year. Now I've got talking to the guy in charge here - http://www.rockschoolkmc.com/ - a really genuinely lovely bloke, and I've done some teaching for him, and now I'm getting enough hours to, well, go pro.
#37
I know this thread is a few weeks old, and I wouldn't bump it, but I think an edit would go relatively un-noticed.

I was thinking about this stuff some more due to a couple other threads, and I thought of something else to add:

I feel that one other important thing a teacher should know is how to get the student to want to play guitar, and how to get the student to want to learn how to play guitar. Granted this isn't always going to be possible, but I think this could be one of those things that separates good teachers from great ones--the great ones make you want to do the practice you have to do to learn the material.

I dunno....for some reason when I write stuff out like this I always start to second guess it and doubt it a bit, but w/e. For example, in this case after writing it, I've started to think about how this is largely influenced by the personality of the student, and is going to be different from student to student, but oh well. The rest of my thought's have already been posted, but I'd like to know what you guys think about this idea.