#1
i was just wondering as most of my friends have been telling me i really need to learn to progress as a skilled bassist.
also i may have to learn it to be part of my schools jazz band.
but is it really worth speding the time in the long run?
thanks!
#2
In short, yes.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#5
if you want to be a musician of any talent and creativity, theory is pretty essential...
if you want to be a pop musician, then skip it and play shitty music
#6
Quote by Travlembo
if you want to be a musician of any talent and creativity, theory is pretty essential...
if you want to be a pop musician, then skip it and play shitty music


Pop musicians are normally sessions musicians, who are extremely talented. For example, Randy Jackson.
#8
Trying to play without knowing theory is like trying to write a book without knowing grammar.
#9
Quote by Travlembo
heh...
ok if you want to be simple plan or green day etc....


Mike Dirnt's (Green Day) early stuff features lots of trills and runs, you'd need theory for that.
David Desrosiers (Simple Plan) also uses things other than root notes, he uses scales and runs too.

Now go and grow up, stop insulting pop punk and admit to yourself that they'll play to millions of people while you sit in your room with Chubbles, your hamster, the only one who can bare to listen to you.

Gear:
Fender Standard Jazz Bass
Artec Matrix Pedal Tuner
BBE Optostomp
Boss GEB 7
EHX NYC Big Muff
Ashdown MAG C410T-300
Torque T100BX
GAS-ing for:
Boss SYB5
Behringer Intelligate IG9
#10
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Pop musicians are normally sessions musicians, who are extremely talented. For example, Randy Jackson.


Or James Jamerson, who trained in HS to go into Jazz.


If you are going to play in a jazz band, you better have theory down. You may get a score for your part or you may just get the lead sheet with chords and be on your own. Either way you're going to need theory and the ability to read music.
#11
The best bass player I know can't explain much of anything about theory. I've tried to ask him what he does, multiple times. Every time he's like "dude, I just really don't know, I just know where to put my fingers for it to sound good".
#12
Quote by corndogggy
The best bass player I know can't explain much of anything about theory. I've tried to ask him what he does, multiple times. Every time he's like "dude, I just really don't know, I just know where to put my fingers for it to sound good".
I'm sure he says that and then goes home and practices his scales
#13
If you develop a good natural ear you'll have no need for theory. That takes a few years however, so you may as well learn theory while you're at it anyway.

personally, i gained a better understanding of music theory playing classical music and at the same time, gained a knack for understanding intervals subconsciencesly (the way notes are related to one another in a melodic series). However, having done this, by the time I switched to bass I didn't need to read any music to find tunes, i could hear what i wanted it to sound like in my head and mimic it without alot of difficulty. So, I've never delved into bass theory past the technique stange, but theoretically, I probably know and understand how to construct most scales.

What i can definately do now, is near instantly play along to pretty much any normal song. As a result i've never touched a tab in my life, which is quite rewarding actually, especially for improvisation.

So yeah, you can live without theory, just about. But it's such a complex task you may as well learn theory and save yourself the trouble.
"I hope I die before I get old"-Words of Pete Townsend, 1945-

"I hope I die before I turn into Pete Townsend"-Words of Kurt Cobain, 1967-1994

Funny old world eh.
#14
...while you sit in your room with Chubbles, your hamster....QUOTE]

For some reason this made me laugh in th middle of class lol.

But yeah. If you have the resources to learn theory (which, seeing as you're able to post here, you do...), there's really no reason not to
#15
Quote by wouldyakindly
If you develop a good natural ear you'll have no need for theory. That takes a few years however, so you may as well learn theory while you're at it anyway.

personally, i gained a better understanding of music theory playing classical music and at the same time, gained a knack for understanding intervals subconsciencesly (the way notes are related to one another in a melodic series). However, having done this, by the time I switched to bass I didn't need to read any music to find tunes, i could hear what i wanted it to sound like in my head and mimic it without alot of difficulty. So, I've never delved into bass theory past the technique stange, but theoretically, I probably know and understand how to construct most scales.

What i can definately do now, is near instantly play along to pretty much any normal song. As a result i've never touched a tab in my life, which is quite rewarding actually, especially for improvisation.

So yeah, you can live without theory, just about. But it's such a complex task you may as well learn theory and save yourself the trouble.


A good natural ear won't tell you how to construct mixolydian, locrian and minor pentatonic scales. Or how to read compound time signatures correctly, or a whole gamut of things that theory teaches you.
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


Leader of the Bass Militia PM to join!



And now on BANDCAMP!


Officially the funniest member of the Bass Forum.