#1
As I'm trying to get into a band as a rhythm guitarist, I will have to jam in their audition. How exactly do you do it? What's the key to playing rhythm, when somebody is soloing in Em (that's what they did last time: they started soloing in Em and I had no idea, what to do ) for example?
Thank you!
#4
Quote by G-Dog_666
Play an E Minor Chord Progression. i.e. Em, G, C, D.

Where did you get this progression, if I may ask? I'm very interested in the theory behind it, but I have no musical education at all (started playing guitar 1 year ago, before what I hated making music).
#6
Quote by Amarant
Where did you get this progression, if I may ask? I'm very interested in the theory behind it, but I have no musical education at all (started playing guitar 1 year ago, before what I hated making music).

Congrats, you're ready to enter the MT forum. Read the theory sticky, and take your time. You won't learn it all in a day. Feel free to ask if you don't understand, we're happy to help.
e minor-a minor-B major is a good safe progression, and you can mix those around as you wish (to a certain extent). If you don't understand the minor/major thing just play powerchords.
#7
It's not power chord music. But what if they say Am or something totally different next time? What chord progression do I do then?
Minor -- sad; major -- happy.
#8
Know what chords fit in what key, and how to make proper progressions.

Generally the chords for Major scales go: M m m M M m diminished.

For example, in the Key of C Major, the chords would be
CM Dm Em FM GM Am Bo

Minor scales generally go: m diminished M m m M M
But the fifth chord can have the 3rd raised (the leading tone), making it a Major chord.

So in Eminor the chords would be
Em Fo G#M Am Bm CM DM

Most common progression would be a IV-V-I (or iv-V-i in Minor) for rock and blues music.
In Eminor that would be Am to Bm to Em
But don't be boring, vary it up and add other chords, but try to focus on the tonic chord (Em in this case).


EDIT: The powerchord idea works too. Then you dont have to worry about major/minor.
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#9
Well I have to say that just saying "Ok, I'm going to solo in this key; give me a backing" is a bloody stupid way to go about it. In my opinion the riff/chords should come first and the solo over that rather than having the backing as being almost incidental to the solo.

Come up with some chord progressions you can put in different keys, even if they're very generic; that way you can at least say "Hey, I've got this little thing we could jam on" which looks much better.
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#11
If you want to learn to improvise, or what to do while someone is improvising, go learn music theory.
This and this are pretty much two goldmines, as well as many more threads and lessons on this site.
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#12
Quote by Amarant
It's not power chord music. But what if they say Am or something totally different next time? What chord progression do I do then?
Minor -- sad; major -- happy.

That's only been "true" for about 100 years. Honestly, it's bogus. I've heard some pretty sad stuff in major, and happy stuff in minor.
Am, your progression is Am-Dm-EM. This is where you start to get into scales and building chords off of scale tones.
EDIT: overriding my previous post, read this FIRST, then go to MT. Good luck!
Last edited by Nightfyre at Sep 3, 2008,
#13
Quote by Amarant
Where did you get this progression, if I may ask? I'm very interested in the theory behind it, but I have no musical education at all (started playing guitar 1 year ago, before what I hated making music).

I just learnt it. I know those chords go in the key of E Minor. I'm not too sure behind the exact theory. It just sounds good. You could also use A Minor or B Minor too to keep your chords mixed up and non-repetitive.

I'm pretty sure there are lessons here on UG which tell you about keys and chord progressions.

To answer the other question you posted: If they jam in A Minor you could play: Am, F, G, D or maybe Am, Dm, Em, Dm to be safe. There are other chords you could play but those two progressions should be fine.

Am, Dm, Em is the I - IV - V progression in A Minor I believe.

E, A, B is the I - IV - V progression in the key of E
A, D, E is the I - IV - V progresion in the key of A
D, G, A is the I - IV - V progression in the key of D

If all else fails play the I-IV-V progression. Maybe adding is a few blues shuffles at times would help mix things up a bit.

If you need any more help just PM me or coment my profile.

Hope you gett he gig dude.
Last edited by G-Dog_666 at Sep 3, 2008,
#14
What does that I - IV - V mean? I'll try to remember those progressions. Thanks!
#15
A link to the first article in a good series columns on theory is in my sig. The author explains theory pretty clearly and starts pretty simple... Click it! You know you want to!
Stop whining and learn your theory!

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#16
ill start by writing all the notes in each key(which is also the chords that fit)

C Dm Em F G Am B
G Am Bm C D Em F#
D Em F#m G A Bm C#
A Bm C#m D E F#m G#
E F#m G#m A B C#m D#
B C#m D#m E F# G#m A#
F# G#m A#m B C# D#m E#
C# D#m E#m F# G# A#m B#


if you notice all the way down the chart a Sharp gets added.

and you asked what a I IV V was
-basically what it is taking that number are playing it

lets take C the notes are:

C Dm Em F G Am B
I II III IV V VI VII
- - -

I-C
IV- F
V- G

so you'd play a C F and G

this can be done all through the list i gave you


(if i messed up that little chart please tell me, or copy and edit it for me, im pretty sure its right though!)
#17
Quote by SunDrop
ill start by writing all the notes in each key(which is also the chords that fit)

C Dm Em F G Am B
G Am Bm C D Em F#
D Em F#m G A Bm C#
A Bm C#m D E F#m G#
E F#m G#m A B C#m D#
B C#m D#m E F# G#m A#
F# G#m A#m B C# D#m E#
C# D#m E#m F# G# A#m B#

How did you make this up :O? I thought Dm was a chord, not a note :O.
Thanks!