#1
What is a good scale for surf music ie dick dale, others 50s surf stuff? I know its a lot of palm mutes on single notes and rapid picking and reverb and whammy bar but what else will capture that sound?
#2
any scale can work for any kind of music, it all depands on how you use it.
it this genre i would avoid using the phryigian or harmonic scales since they sound more egypitien/middle eastern, but anything else would work great.
#3
Quote by Bmg6690
What is a good scale for surf music ie dick dale, others 50s surf stuff? I know its a lot of palm mutes on single notes and rapid picking and reverb and whammy bar but what else will capture that sound?


using the single coil bridge pickup like on a strat or a Fender Jaguar should sound authentically 'surf'
out of here
#4
Quote by domiel
any scale can work for any kind of music, it all depands on how you use it.
it this genre i would avoid using the phryigian or harmonic scales since they sound more egypitien/middle eastern, but anything else would work great.


Pretty much, though Dick Dale's Miserlou uses a 'double harmonic scale' which is fairly exotic and sounds great. Bmg6690 - Just learn a few surf songs & solos to get a good feel for it.
#6
Usually major or minor scales. Sometimes more exotic scales. Scales aren't genre-specific.
#7
Quote by Bmg6690
What is a good scale for surf music ie dick dale, others 50s surf stuff? I know its a lot of palm mutes on single notes and rapid picking and reverb and whammy bar but what else will capture that sound?
Try bar chords, major scales, vocal harmonisation (like the four freshmen) and clever major scale riffs (I'm thinking daytripper or something).

This kind of music *used* to be described as "diatonic," so lay off the out of key notes.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Try bar chords, major scales, vocal harmonisation (like the four freshmen) and clever major scale riffs (I'm thinking daytripper or something).

This kind of music *used* to be described as "diatonic," so lay off the out of key notes.



This is wrong. This music is mixolydian/phrygian add 7 and it always has been. I thought you knew your theory, demonofthenight.

I still support my South Himalayan suspended 9th scale, it's the go to scale for everything.
#9
Quote by Shackman10
This is wrong. This music is mixolydian/phrygian add 7 and it always has been. I thought you knew your theory, demonofthenight.

I still support my South Himalayan suspended 9th scale, it's the go to scale for everything.
wtf are you on about

Why would you think a scale which, by name, probably (I've never heard of it) comes from asia would be used regularily in pop rock and surfie music from the 50's and 60's?

And a scale by definition is a group of notes. The major scale contain the same notes as the phrygian mode and the mixolydian mode, even if the tonic/root note is different and all the intervals are different. I win.
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
wtf are you on about

Why would you think a scale which, by name, probably (I've never heard of it) comes from asia would be used regularily in pop rock and surfie music from the 50's and 60's?

And a scale by definition is a group of notes. The major scale contain the same notes as the phrygian mode and the mixolydian mode, even if the tonic/root note is different and all the intervals are different. I win.

I think he was being sarcastic...
EDIT: Wait, maybe you were as well!
Last edited by Mayano at Sep 6, 2008,
#11
just play instrumental versions of whatever old pop song or jazz standard you can find and add bunch of reverb to it
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
wtf are you on about

Why would you think a scale which, by name, probably (I've never heard of it) comes from asia would be used regularily in pop rock and surfie music from the 50's and 60's?

And a scale by definition is a group of notes. The major scale contain the same notes as the phrygian mode and the mixolydian mode, even if the tonic/root note is different and all the intervals are different. I win.


Actually you lose horribly I was completely kidding -1 for no sarcasm detection.
#13
Most of the time I am content simply saying "the major scale," but what is generally seen as surf music is very reliant on Phrygian tonalities of some sort. The generic "surf riff" is based around Phrygian.
#15
^The technique of tremolo picking is also very prevalent in surf music. The effect became popular because it imitated the sound of tremolo picking to a degree.
#16
old surf music uses steel strings not nickel wound and usually on a jaguar that has a flip up string muter
song stuck in my head today


#17
Quote by Shackman10
Actually you lose horribly I was completely kidding -1 for no sarcasm detection.
More like you were high and I was trolling (once again).