#1
So I just joined my school's jazz band as a bassist and I have a question. The song we're practicing now has a key signature of 2 flats. This means the key of the song is in Bb correct? If so, does that mean that as long as I stay within the major scale of Bb I'll be in key? I just wanna know because I wanna try doing some fills and runs.
#3
It doesn't neccessarily mean you can play any note in that scale because some at any point in the song but it is a great base for improvisation. Also think about the kind of chords that are being played by other instruments when improvising, that always helps me to stay with the rest of the band.
#4
Quote by RCalisto
yes. Bb or Gm



depending on what the focus is.
if the point of resolution is Bb its Bb major, if its G, its Gm
#6
You could invert the harmonics and play F#b minor. In this sense, your harmonic path would conflict with the band's harmonic path and create an existential melody.
#8
^^ That was the only thing that didn't make any sense about his post? The whole post is pointless and means nothing without explanation.. and even then I doubt it means anything worthwhile.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#10
No. In jazz, you are likely to encounter a lot of out-of-key tones. Speak with your band's director about how to do some fills over the progression. You will likely be using more of the Bb mixolydian and blues scales, and chromatic lines than the Bb major scale. In fact, I very much doubt that you would be using the Bb major scale.

Quote by Shackman10
You could invert the harmonics and play F#b minor. In this sense, your harmonic path would conflict with the band's harmonic path and create an existential melody.
*reported*
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Sep 4, 2008,