#1
What does dreadnought mean? is it a size? or is it a type? I'm just wondering.
#2
its a body style
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#3
yeah its a guitar shape, its definetely the most common one

could some1 give him pics...my comps too slow lol
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#4
Dreadnought is just not a body shape, more importantly it's a certain type of sound too. The Dreadnought was named after the first US battleship ever built: 'US DREADNOUGHT'. So 'battleship' is a prety good description of these guitars!

Plenty of bass that's for sure. Suits plectrum playing style best I think. A heck of a lot of finger-pickers hate them, so if finger-picking is going to be your main interest, check out other body sizes that might better suit, although I'm not say you can't pick on a Dreadnought.

Dreadnoughts are the most common type of guitar bought by beginners [it was the first guitar I bought] mainly because they know very little about guitars. They look around and they see lots of Dreadnoughts [bought by other beginners and think they must be the best to buy ... and so it goes on and on]. They don't sit on the knee as well as some other body shapes and really need a strap.

I got rid of my dreadnought long ago, so I might be a bit biased , but I personally feel an OM size guitar would be a more beginner friendly guitar size to handle. Sits easily on the leg well when seated and is OK for plectrum and for finger-picking but without the boomy bass. By 'beginner friendly' I don't mean the OM is a beginner's guitar. A lot of the world's best players use them. Tommy Emmanuel comes to mind and is worth checking out on you-tube if you don't know what OM size means.
Last edited by Akabilk at Sep 4, 2008,
#7
Quote by Akabilk
Dreadnought is just not a body shape, more importantly it's a certain type of sound too. The Dreadnought was named after the first US battleship ever built: 'US DREADNOUGHT'. So 'battleship' is a prety good description of these guitars!

Plenty of bass that's for sure. Suits plectrum playing style best I think. A heck of a lot of finger-pickers hate them, so if finger-picking is going to be your main interest, check out other body sizes that might better suit, although I'm not say you can't pick on a Dreadnought.

Dreadnoughts are the most common type of guitar bought by beginners [it was the first guitar I bought] mainly because they know very little about guitars. They look around and they see lots of Dreadnoughts [bought by other beginners and think they must be the best to buy ... and so it goes on and on]. They don't sit on the knee as well as some other body shapes and really need a strap.

I got rid of my dreadnought long ago, so I might be a bit biased , but I personally feel an OM size guitar would be a more beginner friendly guitar size to handle. Sits easily on the leg well when seated and is OK for plectrum and for finger-picking but without the boomy bass. By 'beginner friendly' I don't mean the OM is a beginner's guitar. A lot of the world's best players use them. Tommy Emmanuel comes to mind and is worth checking out on you-tube if you don't know what OM size means.


very true. i think it's worth mentioning, however, that a few finger pickers still like to use dreadnoughts.

here's an example. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bT3CH6Wr4g

im mainly into dreadnoughts but i do find that OM bodies are MUCH more comfortable to play because they are smaller.
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#9
that's a dreadnought. note that dreadnoughts have big burly shoulders and a larger waist while OM body guitars are much more rounded.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
That will depend on your budget. A guitar that mentions 'solid wood top' would be a good budget starting point for a decent guitar.
Last edited by Akabilk at Sep 6, 2008,