#1
If recently started doing lots of soloing practice(mostly improvising) i've learned to use little bits of things i made up randomly and sticking them together its sound good just not musical enough... I usually do my stuff in A Minor and was wondering if i just got to keep make little bits up and eventually i learn to make them more musical or is there a secret i'm missing? Different Scale? Random Bit of theory i haven't learned?

Thank, Kolby
Guitars
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top ~ Tranparent Amber

Jay Turser JT57FTM ~ Strat. Replica **First guitar**

*If you would like an Avatar like mine(except with your favorite band) Message me and I'll make one for you *
#3
Learn more scales, lots more scales... Scales will help improvising. As for planned solos, I believe ya gotta do what the music tells you to do. A lot of times I hear something in my head before I start playing, like the solo takes on a melody of itself. And as i'm figuring it out, a lot of times I hum/sing the notes I want to hear. If you can sing it, it'll probably sound more musical.

I dunno, that's what I got for you, I'm no expert, more of a singer/songwriter who later on figures out the leads, etc....
#4
Quote by Kolb-Stomp
If recently started doing lots of soloing practice(mostly improvising) i've learned to use little bits of things i made up randomly and sticking them together its sound good just not musical enough... I usually do my stuff in A Minor and was wondering if i just got to keep make little bits up and eventually i learn to make them more musical or is there a secret i'm missing? Different Scale? Random Bit of theory i haven't learned?

Thank, Kolby



Land on the chord tones. That's the missing bit: play wit hthe changes.
Learn CAGED for all 12 keys, it should tell you where each 1st, 3rd and 5th note of the major scale lies. That's gonna be your map. Now it is much easier, since you reduced it from 7 notes (scale) to only 3 notes (basic chord). Now, if the progression was like C-Am-F-Dm (I-vi-IV-ii in the key of C) you would first "focus" on the CAGED for the first chord: C major. What I mean by that is, those note resolve it. You could play everything around it, also, but if you want to stay in key then you'd have to pay a little more attention: you wouldn't touch the b6 (2 frets of the 5, remember WWHWWWH rule for the major scale) but you could play the 7. I hope you understand this.

When switching to other chords (e.g. Am in the progression) CAGED map changes in your head and you adjust it. Since it's a minor chord, you flat the 3rd to make it b3. In time you'll learn what other notes are in key if it's so important to you.

Those chords are the "coolest" notes. At least, they're supposed to be. There's no rule what sounds good.

You don't really have to follow the changes, but start thinking CAGED and scale degrees instead of just some scale notes.

I hope I helped in some way...

Felix
"The end result - the music - is all that counts"
#5
Learn your favourite solo's, the one's you consider most musical. Look at how they use phrases to develop ideas, how they follow the chords etc and apply it to your own solo's
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
I agree completely with Felix. Look for common notes between the scale of the key you're using and the root/3rds/5ths of the chord which is played underneath it.

Sometimes you may even jump outside the scale (:O) if the chord undernealth has a root/3rd/5th that is not within the key's relevant scale. These sound really pronounced and usually everyone gets boners when they hear it.

For good examples I'll just point to any Dire Straits stuff. Any of the guitar licks that Knopfler plays are perfect examples of what Felix said.