#1
Hey guys...

In Marty's video, he mentions 'following the chords'...Does he mean this literally?

For example, if the chord progression is A minor, D minor, E major and F major, do i play those scales (A minor scale over A minor chord etc) directly over the chord?

Thanks for your help....
Quote by mista cricket

Passive pickups? Are there such a thing as aggressive pickup s?

Quote by guitarman015
What is theory?
#2
its more practical to play the corresponding arpeggios to the cords than actually changing scales (although u CAN do it).
Learn the arpeggios to every basic key. That'l help
cheers
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#4
Quote by acidtone
Hey guys...

In Marty's video, he mentions 'following the chords'...Does he mean this literally?

For example, if the chord progression is A minor, D minor, E major and F major, do i play those scales (A minor scale over A minor chord etc) directly over the chord?

Thanks for your help....
You can do that and it will sound pretty good, but what marty's talking about is by using arpeggios and the odd out of key note every so often.
#5
So, stick the A minor, but just arpeggiate over the chords?
Quote by mista cricket

Passive pickups? Are there such a thing as aggressive pickup s?

Quote by guitarman015
What is theory?
#6
he means to end up in a note each chord has.
you don't need to play arpeggios all the time.
#7
Follow the chords to me means that you are aware of the chords and the notes they contain and base your solo on this information. So you could follow them a number of ways scale arrpeggios modaly whatever you want. The key thing to grasp is that you are aware and hearing whats going on in the progression and follow that. As far as which to follow the chords I believe that is a matter of personal preferance. I wouldnt recommend doing only one of those ideas all of the time.
#8
the strongest notes to use in improv are notes that are being played within the chord directly. if you use those notes as a backbone to improv then it will improve your sound.
#9
Hey guys...

In Marty's video, he mentions 'following the chords'...Does he mean this literally?

For example, if the chord progression is A minor, D minor, E major and F major, do i play those scales (A minor scale over A minor chord etc) directly over the chord?

Thanks for your help....

I think you should watch the video again and pay more attention to what he says
Call me Batman.
#11
No, you wouldn't switch scales, I've tried it when I started learning improv and it sounded terrible, unless you'd be using pentatonics or something, but anyways. Stay in the scale of A minor, and pay attention to the arpeggios of each chord, and try to play those notes. Don't neglect passing notes though.
#12
The progression you posted contains chords that are all contained within A harmonic minor, so using that as a jumping-off point would be one approach.

Another approach would be to play the arpeggios of the chords that you're playing over. In that case you could literally play A minor, D minor, E major, and F major arpeggios.

Another possibility would be to play around with relative minor and major arpeggios. For instance, over A minor you could play a C major arpeggio even though A harmonic minor doesn't contain the 5th of C major(G); the C major arp comes from A natural minor. Over D minor, you might play F major, since F major is the relative major of D minor. Over E major, you could play C# minor or even G# diminished. Over F major you could play D minor.

What matters more than WHAT notes you play are WHEN you play those notes. In that vein, everytime you change chords, you want to CLEARLY announce the new chord by playing chord tones on strong beats.

Here's the progression you gave:
|Am---|Dm---|E---|F---:||

A minor is my point of resolution, so on the downbeat of that measure I would play either the root or 5th of the chord: A or E respectively. For the transition from Am to Dm, a very common tool is to play a G on the 4th beat of the 1st measure leading to an F on the first beat of the 2nd measure. For the transition from Dm to E, I might play a C on the 4th beat of the 2nd measure leading to a B on the 1st beat of the 3rd measure. For the transition from E to F, I might play a B leading to a C. To transition from F to Am, I would most likely play G# leading to A. That's just one way of following chords; there are many others. These transitions give you a skeleton that you can fill in however you see fit. Also, try to come up with your own chord tone melody.

Post questions if you have them.
known as Jeff when it really matters