#1
Hey guys im blown away with Tommy Emmanuel being able to hear a melody in his head and having the ability to find it on the guitar.
Obviously it comes with natural talent and alot of practice and experience for tommy to be able to do that but has anyone ever recieved any tips on how you should approach learning this skiil?

So pretty much how did toomy learn how to improvise/hear a melody?
ANd how should i go about learning to do it myself?

Any help is greatly apprietiated!
#2
Well, either get perfect pitch, or learn what certain intervals sound like.

It's just training your ear pretty much.
#3
you need an instructor, one that is really really good. and tommy is one of the greatest folk guitar players ever right behind chet atkins, so id say it would be pretty hard to match his skill. The way he plays is intuitively, or he knows so the guitar so well that he can feel the direction of the music
i enjoy head
#5
I remember an interview where Tommy recalled a story about how he and his brother Phil would play games where one would play a chord and the other had to guess it without looking. He went on to say that he cant read music and that as a youngster everything was learned by imitating what he heard on the radio.
#6
take a bunch of college music classes, pretty sure youll be able to do it after a couple years


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#7
Quote by furph
Hey guys im blown away with Tommy Emmanuel being able to hear a melody in his head and having the ability to find it on the guitar.
Obviously it comes with natural talent and alot of practice and experience for tommy to be able to do that but has anyone ever recieved any tips on how you should approach learning this skiil?

So pretty much how did toomy learn how to improvise/hear a melody?
ANd how should i go about learning to do it myself?

Any help is greatly apprietiated!


there's two ways to learn how to improvise... well... in my opinion anyway.

1. learn the theory behind it. Know for a fact which notes sound good with what key and which scale to apply. learn the theory and then just practice away.

2. play guitar and improv by ear so much that you just know what works.

do a combination of both and you'll be doing improv by reflex.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
Thanks for the help so far guys!!

I came across this program called Earmaster Pro 5.0. It has a series of exercises on intervals and chords and having to identify them. Im trying out the demo and it seems like the way to go if i stick to it for a coulpe of years i should develope great relative pitch or perfect pitch.

One thing i dont understand is how does perfect pitch help improvisation?

HEy captivate i think number two would suit me best i gave theory a go for 3 months and lost interest, so training my ears is my only last option.

So i have the next couple of years to train my ears, all i have to workout now is how im gonna transfer what im hearing in my mind, onto guitar.....
#9
One thing i dont understand is how does perfect pitch help improvisation?


What you hear, is what sounds good to you and if you can play what you hear you'll be sounding good by default. You have to be able to hear where you are going and where you are coming from when improvising. That's a big flaw for most guitarists starting to improv, they don't listen to their playing.

HEy captivate i think number two would suit me best i gave theory a go for 3 months and lost interest, so training my ears is my only last option.



I'm guessing you probably dived right into the deep end of the pool. You should start out slow, just very basic stuff, note names, intervals, key signatures and slowly move into more complicated stuff.

www.musictheory.net <-- this is a great little site to start on.
#10
Quote by confusius
What you hear, is what sounds good to you and if you can play what you hear you'll be sounding good by default. You have to be able to hear where you are going and where you are coming from when improvising. That's a big flaw for most guitarists starting to improv, they don't listen to their playing.


I'm guessing you probably dived right into the deep end of the pool. You should start out slow, just very basic stuff, note names, intervals, key signatures and slowly move into more complicated stuff.

www.musictheory.net <-- this is a great little site to start on.


agreed. take it nice and easy. learning to improv isnt easy, nor is it race. unless you're able to apply theory just like that(i know someone who's played guitar for a year and can play really well since she knows how to apply the theory), it's going to take at least a year of trying it before you start to get it down.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Ok cool guys thats sounds like the way to go ANd yeah i kinda did throw myself in the deep end without learning how to swim!!