#1
I don't know if this goes here but here goes nothing....

Is there different shapes of the Major Penatonic scale, like the Minor Penatonic?
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#2
yeah there are, im not too sure but i think the shapes are the same but start on different frets
#3
Quote by shampooboy37
I don't know if this goes here but here goes nothing....

Is there different shapes of the Major Penatonic scale, like the Minor Penatonic?


Here you go buddy. Ask a question if you're not sure about something.
#4
Quote by mdc
Here you go buddy. Ask a question if you're not sure about something.



i went to the link and all that came up were the minor penatonic scales....
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#5
Yes. The shapes of a major pentatonic scale will be identical to the shapes of the minor pentatonic whose root is a major 6th above the root you want. For example, the Am Pentatonic has the same box patterns and shapes as the C major pentatonic. A is a major 6th above C.

Clear or no?
#6
i don't get it... from what your sayin the major pentatonic is all the same shape just on differenet places on the fret board?
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#7
Every minor pent has a relative major pent that is the exact same notes.
Ultimately, in order to understand that, you have to understand the concept
of relative major/minors.

So, it's the same notes, but the root note is different (and all the other notes
have different scale degrees relative to the root).
#8
ok yeah you lost me completely
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#10
Quote by shampooboy37
ok yeah you lost me completely


You've been given the answer. The problem is you lack the basic background to
understand it. Trying to give that to you here would be tedious. It's not all that
hard, but trying to describe things with only ascii text will make it sound more
complicated than it really is. I'd suggest you find a good web page or book that
diagrams and pictures of how scales work, how the notes are arranged on the
fretboard and that covers major, minor and pentatonic scales.
#11
Alright the relative minor of a major key will have it's root 3 frets below the major (if you don't understand what a "root" is, I'll explain it later). For example the relative minor of C is Am and the relative minor of G is Em. The scale notes for G major pentatonic are the exact same as the notes for Em pentatonic. The difference is that the relative minor has a different root note. In the case of G major, the root is G and it's relative minor, Em, has a root of E. Pretty simple.

Here's the most basic pentatonic position. It's in Am/C. The leftmost notes start on the 5th fret. Read this as you would a tab.

A X X C
E X X G
C X D
G X A
D X E
A X X C

As you can see, there are only 5 notes in this scale, A, C, D, E, and G, hence PENTatonic. Again, the only difference between Am pent and C pent is that the root is the A versus the C. When we say root, we mean the tonal center or the resolving note. In other words, when the song ends, you usually want to end on the resolving note because it seems to complete the song. This usually works when you end a cycle of chords. You're going to have to play around with this to really understand what I mean.

Does that help?
#12
Quote by shampooboy37
i don't get it... from what your sayin the major pentatonic is all the same shape just on differenet places on the fret board?
The C major pentatonic contains the exact same notes as the A minor pentatonic, and therefore the same boxes and shapes and patterns. Am is considered the relative minor of C major since they contain the same notes. Likewise, C major is considered the relative major of A minor, though this is almost slang since every other scale is compared to the major scale when you describe its intervals.

Please read the theory link in my sig up to "Modes" multiple times before you ask another question. Your question is almost assuredly addressed (awesome alliteration by Ban!) in that lesson.