#1
ok i am having a hard time to match the groove with drums.
i try to listen to the bass drum, but i can only hear;
i never get the rhythmic pattern, but i just know that there
are bass drum oomphs here and there. i play gospels and worship songs btw.
can any1 help me out?
*edit.. what kind of practices can i do? I only can play with drums when there is
a crowd.
I'm a proud owner of
Gibson SG Standard Heritage Cherry
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Buzz Saw sig w/ EMG 81/85
Squire crap
Fender American Deluxe Jazz bass
ESP/LTD TA-600 Tom Araya sig bass
Vox AD30VT
Fender Bassman 100
Line6 POD X3
Boss ME-50
#4
record the church band. then jam to that.

I'm in a church band too, and that's what I do.
Quote by FatalGear41
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HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#5
What kind of listening setup do you have?

I would suggest if you're trying to listen for the bass drum on computer speakers it won't help you. You need a proper stereo with reasonable speakers to hear the low-end like that (this is an assumption on my behalf, you might have great speakers).

If you listen to those bass-drum oomphs you'll notice some form of pattern, which is the rhythm. Here are a few common bass drum patterns that you're likely to hear, with x signifying the bass note.


  1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
|-x-------x-x-----|:     Standard rock beat

|-x-------x-------|:     Simplified rock beat

|-x---x---x---x---|:     4 on the floor disco


Try counting those beats and playing along.

Another approach that some songs on bass guitar use is just playing straight, constant 8th notes, which requires little to no knowledge of rhythm. All you do is playing the root note of the chords on every beat of a '1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +' count, then change notes when the chord changes. You can spice this technique up by leading into chord changes by leading up or down to the next chord with a few notes from the chord you're playing. For example:


   G                 D
G|-----------------|-----------------|
D|-----------------|-----------------|
A|-------------2-3-|-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
E|-3-3-3-3-3-5-----|-----------------|


When changing a G chord to a D chord you can run up the G scale until you reach the D on the 1st beat of the next bar.
#6
I use a labtop recorder and set it right next to the bass drum.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#7
When first playing with a live drummer, you need to key on the bass drum. 95% of the time for most music you will be playing a note when the bass drum kicks. The other element to listen to is either the ride or hi-hat cymbals since they tend to set the basic rhythm as well.

Also watch for physical cues when your drummer is playing. After a while you'll be able to tell by the physical movements of the drummer when he's going to throw in a fill or subtly shift a rhythm. I always position myself where I can see the drummer for this reason.

There are a tonne of drum loops out there on the internet, download them and practice with them as part of your daily routine. Also picking up some drum theory doesn't hurt either; like playing bass helps hearing the bass in songs, learning a bit of drum theory helps you to key in on your partner in the rhythm section.
#8
where can i get a good solid collection of common drum patterns?
(better if the material is specialized in gospel music)
is there a particular website or lesson books that you recommend?
I'm a proud owner of
Gibson SG Standard Heritage Cherry
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Buzz Saw sig w/ EMG 81/85
Squire crap
Fender American Deluxe Jazz bass
ESP/LTD TA-600 Tom Araya sig bass
Vox AD30VT
Fender Bassman 100
Line6 POD X3
Boss ME-50
#9
Is it possible for you to take a couple of drum lessons? Even 3 or 4 one hour lessons would be enough to give you a bit of exposure to the drum kit as an instrument.

Obviously you wont be setting the world alight with your synchopated jazz fusion beats or thrilling the crowd with 32nd beat drum fills but it should be enough to make you familiar with a standard blues/rock groove which I think would be a big help.
#10
Quote by teh_shredmaster
where can i get a good solid collection of common drum patterns?
(better if the material is specialized in gospel music)
is there a particular website or lesson books that you recommend?


The best resource is probably drum books or actual drummers.

Why don't you ask your church drummer if you can jam with him/her outside of performance?
#11
I have a few loops in mp3 form that I could upload and get to you if you're interested. PM me.

Another option is to get a cheap ass keyboard (charity/goodwill stores are a good resource as are garage sales) with drum loops built in. Plus having a keyboard about the house is useful as a second or third instrument. Even my low end "realistic" keyboard has about 99 drum sequences from hip hop to several jazz sequences.